ROBERT L O'CONNOR
VIEW ALL PHOTOS (2)
HONORED ON PANEL 10W, LINE 19 OF THE WALL

ROBERT LEE O'CONNOR

WALL NAME

ROBERT L O'CONNOR

PANEL / LINE

10W/19

DATE OF BIRTH

07/30/1948

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG NAM

DATE OF CASUALTY

05/11/1970

HOME OF RECORD

LOS ANGELES

COUNTY OF RECORD

Los Angeles County

STATE

CA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SSGT

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR ROBERT LEE O'CONNOR
POSTED ON 8.10.2016
POSTED BY: Curt Carter ccarter02@earthlink.net

Remembering An American Hero

Dear SSGT Robert Lee O'Connor, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, Sir

Curt Carter
read more read less
POSTED ON 12.2.2015
POSTED BY: wkillian@smjuhsd.org

Final Mission of SSGT Robert L. O’Connor

On May 11, 1970, Ranger Team Kansas was providing radio relay and reconnaissance for LRRP (Long-range reconnaissance patrol) teams attached to the 101st Airborne inserted in the A Shau Valley, one of the key entry points into South Vietnam for men and materiel brought along the Ho Chi Minh Trail by the Communist North Vietnamese Army. The team consisted of six members: SGT Raymond D. Ellis, SSGT Robert L. O’Connor, SGT Gary P. Baker, SGT David Munoz, CPL George E. Fogleman, and PFC Bryan T. Knight. Less than a kilometer away in thick bamboo stands was a LRRP team monitoring an enemy high speed trail a few feet away from their concealed position. While on watch, one of the LRRP team members heard the faint sound of automatic weapons fire coming from the direction of the Kansas team. Listing intently, a few minutes later he then heard what sounded like six single pistol shots spaced about ten seconds apart. Concerned, the LRRP member tried to raise the Kansas team’s radio operator, but got no answer. After several unsuccessful attempts to call the team, the LRRP member called the TOC (tactical operations center) which deployed an OH-6A “Loach” to establish contact with the missing radio relay team. The Loach pilot reported that he’d spotted what appeared to be six bodies sprawled across a trail. A Ranger team was dispatched to the radio relay team’s position. The six Kansas team members lay dead, each with a gunshot wound to the head and each man’s skull crushed with a rifle butt. No one was sure what occurred, but what was surmised is that a small number of NVA had simply walked right up and killed them instantly. The enemy had probably been watching the team for days, waiting for the right time to make their move. Three piles of empty brass cartridges surrounded the bodies, indicating only three NVA soldiers had carried out the shooting. All the American’s weapons were gone. Their web gear and ruck sacks and radio were still there, and their pockets were inside out. A group of 20 men from B Troop, 17th Cavalry was inserted to help with the recovery of their slain comrades. The incident spooked a lot of the Rangers and had a devastating effect on the company. A week later, a Ranger team was inserted in the same AO (area of operations). While surveying the abandoned former Firebase Whip, the team ambushed and killed two NVA soldiers. After searching the dead soldier’s bodies, they found evidence that the two had been responsible for the tragedy which befell the radio relay team Kansas. Vengeance was wrought on the enemy, a fortuitous retaliation and psychological victory for the Rangers. [Taken from the book Death in the A Shau Valley by Larry Chambers]
read more read less
POSTED ON 7.13.2015

Major Michael Davis Oconnor

Thank you so much for your sacrifice for our country, for people like me and my three children. They were able to grow up free from your sacrifices
Thank you
read more read less
POSTED ON 10.25.2012
POSTED BY: Tom O'Connor

Remembrance

Remembrance

*

read more read less
POSTED ON 3.28.2006
POSTED BY: Bill Nelson

Never Forgotten

FOREVER REMEMBERED

"If you are able, save for them a place inside of you....and save one backward glance when you are leaving for the places they can no longer go.....Be not ashamed to say you loved them....
Take what they have left and what they have taught you with their dying and keep it with your own....And in that time when men decide and feel safe to call the war insane, take one moment to embrace those gentle heroes you left behind...."

Quote from a letter home by Maj. Michael Davis O'Donnell
KIA 24 March 1970. Distinguished Flying Cross: Shot down and Killed while attempting to rescue 8 fellow soldiers surrounded by attacking enemy forces.

We Nam Brothers pause to give a backward glance, and post this remembrance to you, one of the gentle heroes lost to the War in Vietnam:

Slip off that pack. Set it down by the crooked trail. Drop your steel pot alongside. Shed those magazine-ladened bandoliers away from your sweat-soaked shirt. Lay that silent weapon down and step out of the heat. Feel the soothing cool breeze right down to your soul ... and rest forever in the shade of our love, brother.

From your Nam-Band-Of-Brothers
read more read less