MELVIN E NEWLIN
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HONORED ON PANEL 23E, LINE 5 OF THE WALL

MELVIN EARL NEWLIN

WALL NAME

MELVIN E NEWLIN

PANEL / LINE

23E/5

DATE OF BIRTH

09/27/1948

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG NAM

DATE OF CASUALTY

07/04/1967

HOME OF RECORD

WELLSVILLE

COUNTY OF RECORD

Columbiana County

STATE

OH

BRANCH OF SERVICE

MARINE CORPS

RANK

PFC

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR MELVIN EARL NEWLIN
POSTED ON 7.4.2017
POSTED BY: A US Marine, Vietnam

Medal of Honor

Melvin Earl Newlin
Date of birth: September 27, 1948
Date of death: July 4, 1967
Burial location: Wellsville, Ohio
Place of Birth: Ohio, Wellsville
Home of record: Cleveland Ohio
Status: KIA

AWARDS AND CITATIONS

Medal of Honor

Awarded for actions during the Vietnam War

The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pride in presenting the Medal of Honor (Posthumously) to Private First Class Melvin Earl Newlin (MCSN: 2229466), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as a machine gunner attached to the First Platoon, Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, on 3 and 4 July 1967, in action against armed enemy forces in Quang Nam Province, Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class Newlin, with four other Marines, was manning a key position on the perimeter of the Nong Son outpost when the enemy launched a savage and well coordinated mortar and infantry assault, seriously wounding him and killing his four comrades. Propping himself against his machinegun, he poured a deadly accurate stream of fire into the charging ranks of the Viet Cong. Though repeatedly hit by small-arms fire, he twice repelled enemy attempts to overrun his position. During the third attempt, a grenade explosion wounded him again and knocked him to the ground unconscious. The Viet Cong guerrillas, believing him dead, bypassed him and continued their assault on the main force. Meanwhile, Private First Class Newlin regained consciousness, crawled back to his weapon, and brought it to bear on the rear of the enemy, causing havoc and confusion among them. Spotting the enemy attempting to bring a captured 106 recoilless weapon to bear on other Marine positions, he shifted his fire, inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy and preventing them from firing the captured weapon. He then shifted his fire back to the primary enemy force, causing the enemy to stop their assault on the Marine bunkers and to once again attack his machinegun position. Valiantly fighting off two more enemy assaults, he firmly held his ground until mortally wounded. Private First Class Newlin had single-handedly broken up and disorganized the entire enemy assault force, causing them to lose momentum and delaying them long enough for his fellow Marines to organize a defense and beat off their secondary attack. His indomitable courage, fortitude, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of almost certain death reflect great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service.

Action Date: July 03 & 4, 1967

Service: Marine Corps

Rank: Private First Class

Company: Company F

Battalion: 2d Battalion

Regiment: 5th Marines

Division: 1st Marine Division (Rein.) FMF
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POSTED ON 5.9.2016
POSTED BY: Savannah Hinojosa

Thank you

Thank you all for honoring my great uncle. I wish i could of met him and thanked him.
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POSTED ON 5.2.2016
POSTED BY: Bob Ahles, Vietnam Vet, St. Cloud, MN

Peace with Honor

You were one of the brave that answered the call. You honored us by your service and sacrifice. We now honor you each time we stand and sing the words “THE LAND OF THE FREE AND THE HOME OF THE BRAVE”. Rest in Peace and Honor Melvin.
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POSTED ON 7.3.2015
POSTED BY: Michael "MO" Harris

My Friend Pete Newlin

I met Pete Newlin early in 1967. I was a forward observer attached to the 2nd Bn., 5th Marine Regiment at An Hoa, RVN. We met at the EM cLub over a couple of beers. He heard me talking to another Marine at our table about my birth date...when I told this Marine it was September 20, 1948, from down at the end of our table came a shout, hey, I was born on September 27, 1948. He moved to an open seat directly in front of me and we became instant friends. I loved Pete. He was a kind and funny guy. Over the next few months we became close when we able to see each other. We participated together in Operation Union II, and how any of us made it out alive that June 2nd day was a miracle. I was at the Nong Son Outpost on 30 June, 1967, when Fox 2/5 arrived to take over duty there from Echo 2/5 who I was attached to at the time as an FO. I got to spend some time with Pete and some of my good buddies with the 81mm mortar platoon. Then on 2 July 1967, Echo headed out to patrol in Antenna Valley, about five or six clicks from Nong Son. On the night of 3 July, I witnessed the attack as the initial mortar rounds impacted on the top of the hill where the main attack took place. My Company was sent from the Valley to assist Fox in anyway that was needed. When we reached the Song Thu Bon River only one of our platoon's crossed the river, and I was with that platoon. I went with acting CO, 1st Lt. Scuras as he made his way to the top of the hill with a relief force. The Echo platoon took over the security positions abandoned by the Fox platoon that went to the top of the hill. I got to the top of the hill a little after 0100 hours. I won't tell you what it looked like but it was bad. There were dead Marines and VC lying everywhere. The VC destroyed one of the 81 mortars, but I was able to put together a gun crew for the other mortar and I began firing at the VC's routes of retreat. Afterwards I helped dig Marines out of collapsed bunkers. There were many of my good buddies dead...Mel, I always called him Pete was dead. James Ball, Danny Riesberg, Ron Reyes, John Lateigne (spelling of last name noi correct), and Walt Buschleiter. I always remember Melvin "Pete" Newlin and all those who lost their lives in the attack every 3-4 July.
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POSTED ON 7.4.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter

Remembering An American Hero

Dear PFC Melvin E Newlin, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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