JOHN L BENDOR
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HONORED ON PANEL 29W, LINE 4 OF THE WALL

JOHN LEE BENDOR

WALL NAME

JOHN L BENDOR

PANEL / LINE

29W/4

DATE OF BIRTH

08/01/1949

CASUALTY PROVINCE

PHU YEN

DATE OF CASUALTY

03/11/1969

HOME OF RECORD

SOLANO

COUNTY OF RECORD

Solano County

STATE

CA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SP4

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR JOHN LEE BENDOR
POSTED ON 5.17.2021
POSTED BY: john fabris

honoring you....

Thank you for your service to our country so long ago sir. As long as you are remembered you will always be with us....
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POSTED ON 2.3.2017
POSTED BY: Lucy Conte Micik

Remembered

DEAR SPEC 4 BENDOR,
THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE AS A FLIGHT QUALIFIED AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE APPRENTICE. IT IS 2017, WHICH MAKES IT FAR TOO LONG FOR YOU TO HAVE BEEN GONE. WE APPRECIATE ALL YOU HAVE DONE, AND YOUR SACRIFICE. WATCH OVER THE U.S.A., IT STILL NEEDS YOUR COURAGE.. GOD BLESS YOU. MAY THE SAINTS AND ANGELS BE AT YOUR SIDE. REST IN PEACE.
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POSTED ON 1.25.2015

Final Mission of SP4 John L. Bendor

At 1300 hours on March 11, 1969, a U.S. Army helicopter UH-1H (tail number 68-15371) was supporting the Republic of Korea (ROK) troops on a Snoopy Mission (flying at tree-top level trying to draw enemy fire so as to have him expose themselves). WO1 Larry L. Stoner flew the low level requirement of the mission. He was supported by a chase ship and two ships from the 129th Assualt Helicopter Company. The Snoopy Mission was completed at approximately 1500 hours. The gunships were released at this time to return to Lane Army Heliport (Lane AHP), about ten miles inland from the coastal city of Qui Nhon, to remain on standby status. The two remaining ships were retained at Miami Beach, 26th ROK Regiment, coordinates CQ 103-780, pending further mission requirements from the supported unit. The two UH-1H aircraft refueled and decided to return to Lane AHP by flying due west along the Song Cai River to a point in the vicinity of the railroad bridge involved in the accident, then fly north and follow Route 68 which would take them directly back to Lane. The two aircraft took off shortly after 1545 hours with one aircraft piloted by WO1 Slavens flying at an altitude of 200 to 400 feet above ground level (AGL) while WO1 Stoner was flying at approximately 100 feet AGL. The bridge at the scene of the accident is located exactly 14 kilometers west of Miami Beach. Just prior to reaching the proximity of the bridge WO1 Stoner made a transmission on the UHF radio in which he stated that he was going to attempt to fly under the railroad bridge. He asked WO1 Slavens if he would like to follow him through, WO1 Slavens replied that he would not as that he was getting too short for that sort of thing. WO1 Slavens, who at the time was taking pictures, had his co-pilot maneuver the aircraft in such a manner as to get just approximately higher and to the right of the bridge. They approached the bridge approximately 80-90 knots. At a distance of 200 meters short of the bridge WO1 Slavens instructed his co-pilot to slow up the aircraft so that he could take a picture of the other aircraft going underneath. As WO1 Stoner approached the bridge he appeared to be clear of the bottom girder of the steel I-beam structure. At this time WO1 Stoner started a flaring left turn in an attempt to avoid collision with the lowest portion of the bridge. Before turn could be completed and enough altitude gained the rotor mast struck a vertical I-beam support at the lower section of the bridge. The main rotor mast sheared off just below the dampeners, the remainder of the aircraft, now out of sight but assumed to be intact rolled inverted, impacted the ground and spun 180 and came to rest sixty meters away from the bridge. Upon impact with the bridge, WO1 Slavens took control of his aircraft and flew to the other side where he saw that the aircraft was inverted and tilted to the left front, the tail boom had separated from main body of the aircraft and a fire started, presumably on impact. WO1 Slavens landed immediately and instructed his crew chief and gunner to get out and render assistance to the crew of the crashed aircraft. As the crew members rushed from their aircraft, the Korean passenger followed by the crew chief were observed crawling from the wreckage. The co-pilot also survived the crash. However, pilot WO1 Stoner and his gunner, SP4 John L. Bendor, suffered fatal injuries in the crash. [Taken from vhpa.org]
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POSTED ON 3.11.2014
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear SP4 John Lee Bendor, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

With respect, Sir

Curt Carter
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POSTED ON 1.9.2011
POSTED BY: Robert Sage

We Remember

John is buried at Roselawn Cemetery, Tallahassee, Leon County,FL.
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