JAMES B MILLS
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HONORED ON PANEL 10E, LINE 130 OF THE WALL

JAMES BURTON MILLS

WALL NAME

JAMES B MILLS

PANEL / LINE

10E/130

DATE OF BIRTH

08/31/1940

CASUALTY PROVINCE

NZ

DATE OF CASUALTY

09/21/1966

HOME OF RECORD

BAKERSFIELD

COUNTY OF RECORD

Kern County

STATE

CA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

NAVY

RANK

LCDR

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR JAMES BURTON MILLS
POSTED ON 10.15.2001
POSTED BY: Lynne Bagamery

Never Forgotten

As a child, my parents instilled a deep sense of pride and patriotism in me. I was born in 1961 and remember very little of the war in Vietnam. However, the early 70's were a wake up call for me. I wanted to do something to show my support for the men and women who fought for freedom, only to be shunned as they returned home. Because of my age, I felt that the best option would be to wear POW/MIA bracelets to show I cared. I have always wondered what became of the men whose bracelets were on my wrists fo many years. I have kept these treasured items hoping that one day I would find out that my "men" had safely returned home. If anyone knows of Lt. Mills' family whereabouts and can contact them, I would be honored to return his bracelet to them. Perhaps just knowing that a "kid" cared would give them some comfort. Thank you and God Bless America!
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POSTED ON 5.23.2001
POSTED BY: Jim Rude

High School Acquaintance

I remember Jim from the stand point of a lowly freshman. I always looked at him as someone beyond my scope; a super success.
It wasn't until well after I returned from Vietnam in 1967 that I heard about Jim Mills, MIA and brother in arms.
I'm so saddened.

Jim 2/503 - 173rd Sep.
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POSTED ON 2.26.2001
POSTED BY: Robert Greer

Lest We Forget

( photo from cover of Parade magazine, Sunday, May 30, 1993 )
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POSTED ON 9.9.1999
POSTED BY: Debbie Huggins McIntosh

BIO of LCDR James B. Mills

LCDR James B. Mills, USNR, was born August 31, 1940, in Oklahoma, moving with his family to California in 1946, settling in Bakersfield in 1954 where he attended public schools.

Jimmy Mills graduated from Bakersfield High School where he compiled an excellent academic record and participated in numerous extra-curricular activities. He served in several student government positions, earned letters each of four years in football, basketball, and track, and was recognized as one of twenty outstanding seniors in a graduating class of over 800. Jim Mills attended Bakersfield College for one year before transferring to the University of California, Berkeley, where he majored in Business Administration, receiving his BA in 1963. While at Cal, he was a member of Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity.

Jim joined the US Navy and was sent to Officer Candidate School in Newport, Rhode Island, where he received his commission as an Ensign. He entered flight training at Pensacola NAS, Florida, continued at Glenco NAS, Georgia, and
returned to Florida for survival school. His final training took place at Miramar NAS, San Diego, California, from where his squadron deployed to Southeast Asia.

LTjg Mills’ first tour of duty in Southeast Asia, 1964-1965, was aboard the USS Midway as a Radar Intercept Officer on a Phantom F4-B; during that time, he completed 148 combat missions over North Vietnam. He volunteered for his second tour, this time aboard the USS Coral Sea. While flying his 7th combat mission, his Phantom F4-B disappeared from radar about 20 miles north of the DMZ, between Thanh Hoa and Vinh, North Vietnam. His fate is still unknown.

Lieutenant Commander James B. Mills, USNR, is the recipient of numerous awards and decorations. He is the son of Lois Wesson Mills, now of Brea, California, and the late E.C. "Bus" Mills. His brother, Bill, resides in Scottsdale, Arizona. His sister, Ann Mills Griffiths of Arlington, Virginia, is serving her 21st year as executive director of the National League of POW/MIA Families. Judie Mills Taber, the youngest of LCDR Mills’ siblings, resides in La Habra, California. The Mills family is committed to achieving the return of all prisoners, the fullest possible accounting for the missing, and the repatriation of all recoverable remains of those who died serving our nation during the Vietnam War.
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