JAMES C MARSHALL
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HONORED ON PANEL 36E, LINE 24 OF THE WALL

JAMES CONRAD MARSHALL

WALL NAME

JAMES C MARSHALL

PANEL / LINE

36E/24

DATE OF BIRTH

07/29/1946

CASUALTY PROVINCE

GIA DINH

DATE OF CASUALTY

01/31/1968

HOME OF RECORD

MONROEVILLE

COUNTY OF RECORD

Monroe County

STATE

AL

BRANCH OF SERVICE

MARINE CORPS

RANK

CPL

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR JAMES CONRAD MARSHALL
POSTED ON 6.22.2020
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Cpl James Marshall, Thank you for your service as a Warehouse Clerk. Saying thank you isn't enough, but it is from the heart. Yesterday was Father’s Day and it’s summer. Time passes quickly. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 5.24.2018
POSTED BY: Carlene

Vietnam Embassy TET Offense

Remembering you in this day when we need to remember our heros.I am so sorry for all the hurting left, but peace should come far more often to the hearts of many men, remembering your scarafice. I pray your spirt will dwell with so many young people today and encourage them to understand what life means in the sweetest ways. Always thinking of you. Thanks for helping many of us to get home.
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POSTED ON 5.16.2018
POSTED BY: Lore Wiseman

Fellow Marine Security Guard

I believe you were in my class at Henderson Hall graduating in Oct 1967. Rest in peace and Semper Fidelis.
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POSTED ON 2.1.2018
POSTED BY: William R. Philen

In Rememberance of One of Our Own

Though we never met, I will never forget the moment I learned of your death. While in study hall at MCHS, your alma mater, I was told you had been killed. You were Kay's brother, whom everyone liked, & her pain we shared. In later years I was a member of FBC in Monroeville where your funeral was held and where your family attended. You really were from a very special family. To a Soph. at MCHS your death opened our eyes to the war in Vietnam, in time to the deaths of several more friends from our county who also paid the ultimate sacrifice. Your mother, father, and Kay are now all deceased. Occasionally as I drive into Monroeville I will stop and visit your grave. Today being the 50th anniversary since your death I have thought about you most of the day. This post is my way of saying you are not forgotten,
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POSTED ON 7.5.2016

Final Mission of CPL James C. Marshall

Shortly after midnight on January 31, 1968, 19 Viet Cong sappers from the elite C-10 Sapper Battalion gathered at a Viet Cong safe house in a car repair shop at 59 Phan Thanh Gian Street in Saigon to distribute weapons and conduct final preparations for an attack on the U.S. Embassy. The unit set off in a small truck and a taxi towards central Saigon. As the vehicles came down Mac Dinh Chi Street with their lights off after curfew, they were spotted by a Vietnamese police guard post north of the embassy, but rather than trying to stop the vehicles, the police instead took cover. As the taxi turned from Mac Dinh Chi Street onto Thong Nhut Boulevard, the occupants opened fired on the two military police (MPs) guarding the night gate. The MPs, SP4 Charles L. Daniel and PFC William E. Sebast, returned fire, closed and locked the steel gate and radioed that they were under attack. At 02:47 hours the Viet Cong blew a small hole in the perimeter wall on Thong Nhut Boulevard and gained access to the embassy compound. The first two Viet Cong that crawled through the hole and into the grounds were shot and killed by SP4 Daniel and PFC Sebast in their guard post at the Mac Dinh Chi Street entrance. Daniel radioed, "They're coming in! They're coming in! Help me! Help me!" before the radio went silent. Daniel and Sebast were themselves shot and killed by the Viet Cong. Inside the embassy, the Viet Cong opened fire on the Chancery building with Type 56 assault rifles and B-40 rocket-propelled grenades. An MP jeep patrol responded to the calls for help from Daniel and Sebast but as they approached the embassy they were met by automatic weapons fire from the Viet Cong that were outside the wall, killing SGT Johnie B. Thomas and SFC Owen E. Mebust. In the embassy grounds, the Viet Cong were unsure of their next move as both of the sapper team's leaders, Bay Tuyen and Ut Nho, had both been killed early in the attack by Daniel and Sebast after they entered the embassy grounds. The Viet Cong were armed with more than 40 pounds of C-4 explosive and could easily have blasted their way into the Chancery had they been ordered to do so. Instead they took positions in or near the circular planters around the Chancery and returned fire at the growing numbers of Americans shooting at them. At 04:20, General William Westmoreland ordered the 716th MP Battalion to clear the embassy as their first priority. Lacking armored vehicles and helicopters, the MPs moved in more troops to cordon off the Embassy. The tactical situation was confused by darkness and the poor communications within the Chancery and between the Chancery and the MPs and Marines outside the Embassy compound. Marine Corporal James C. Marshall climbed the roof of a small building in the Consular compound and was firing on Viet Cong in the Embassy compound, when he was hit by a rocket fragment. He remained in place firing on the Viet Cong until he was shot and killed. He would be the last American killed at the Embassy that day. As dawn broke on the morning of January 31st, the hole that the Viet Cong had blown in the wall to gain access to the Embassy compound was located. At the same time, MPs had finally managed to shoot off the locks of the front gate on Thong Nhut Boulevard and rammed the gates open with a jeep. The MPs and Marines charged through the open gate into the Embassy grounds and within a few minutes, they easily killed all of the few surviving Viet Cong for most of them by then were already dead or dying in the Embassy garden from the prolonged firefight. At the same time, a helicopter carrying troops from the 101st Airborne Division landed on the roof and proceeded to sweep the Chancery building, finding no Viet Cong inside. By 09:00, the Embassy was declared secure. Of the 19 Viet Cong fighters that attacked the building, 18 had been killed and one wounded fighter was captured. (Image is of the plaque commemorating the 4 MPs and 1 Marine who died defending the U.S. Embassy in Saigon on January 31, 1968) [Taken from Wikipedia.org]
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