PAUL W MANSIR
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HONORED ON PANEL 2E, LINE 81 OF THE WALL

PAUL WAYNE MANSIR

WALL NAME

PAUL W MANSIR

PANEL / LINE

2E/81

DATE OF BIRTH

05/28/1943

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG NAM

DATE OF CASUALTY

09/11/1965

HOME OF RECORD

FT WORTH

COUNTY OF RECORD

TARRANT COUNTY

STATE

TX

BRANCH OF SERVICE

MARINE CORPS

RANK

PFC

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR PAUL WAYNE MANSIR
POSTED ON 8.1.2023
POSTED BY: John allison

Served together

If any family member wants to talk about Paul I will leave my email. I was about 100 yards from him when he died.
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POSTED ON 7.31.2023
POSTED BY: John

Served together

Served from first day of boot camp to Vietnam
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POSTED ON 7.21.2023
POSTED BY: john fabris

honoring you.....

"The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena; whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotions and spends himself in a great worthy cause; who at the best, knows in the end triumph of high achievement and, at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while caring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold, timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat." Theodore Roosevelt
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POSTED ON 5.27.2023
POSTED BY: Alan W Ellis

Thank you for your Service

Son of Master Sgt Thomas A. Ellis, my name is Alan W. Ellis, USAF Reserve SSgt 1970 - 1976. Family friends and attended Paul Wayne’s funeral. I will never forget his bravery and the ultimate price he paid for our freedom.
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POSTED ON 10.23.2020

Final Mission of PFC Paul W. Mansir

On September 10, 1965, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marines received orders to move by fixed-wing aircraft from Chu Lai to Da Nang, RVN, to act as a blocking force for Army of the Republic of Vietnam (ARVN) forces conducting search and destroy operations as part of Operation Golden Fleece and Rice Straw. The Battalion arrived in Da Nang at 1:40 PM, received a briefing, and by 6:00 PM, were in their assigned blocking position near Nui Dat Son (Hill 55) after being helilifted into the area. An hour later, a Marine from L Company, 3/3, LCPL Henry J. Zeichert, was killed after stepping on a 155mm howitzer shell rigged as a mine. The remainder of the night was characterized by sporadic sniper fire with no casualties reported. Early the next morning, the 3rd Battalion Command Group began moving from the Battalion observation post to a new location when Battalion Commander LTC Joseph E. Muir stepped on a booby-trapped 155mm round. The 5:42 AM blast killed Muir and his radioman, PFC Paul W. Mansir; two other Marines were seriously wounded, including the Battalion S-3 operations officer. Two others suffered minor injuries. Some radios were destroyed by the explosion, prompting a request to the 9th Marines for replacements. The 155mm round was buried nose-up and detonated by pressure applied against another charge buried with it. The Battalion Executive Officer was notified immediately of the incident and assumed command. Muir was the first American battalion commander to be killed in Vietnam. He was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross for his bold leadership during Operation Starlite the previous month. Hill 55, after extensive demining in early 1966, became the regimental command post for the 9th Marines and was named Camp Muir. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and G-3 Journal (3rd Marine Division), September 1965, and Command Chronology, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marines, September 1965, at ttu.edu]
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