JULIUS MADDOX
VIEW ALL PHOTOS (1)
HONORED ON PANEL 45E, LINE 58 OF THE WALL

JULIUS MADDOX

WALL NAME

JULIUS MADDOX

PANEL / LINE

45E/58

DATE OF BIRTH

08/10/1947

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG NAM

DATE OF CASUALTY

03/22/1968

HOME OF RECORD

DETROIT

COUNTY OF RECORD

Wayne County

STATE

MI

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

PFC

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR JULIUS MADDOX
POSTED ON 3.22.2019
POSTED BY: Janice Current

An American Hero

Thank you for your service and your sacrifice. Thank you for stepping up and answering your country's call. Rest easy knowing you will never be forgotten.
read more read less
POSTED ON 3.22.2017
POSTED BY: A Grateful Vietnam Veteran

Distinguished Service Cross

Julius Maddox
Date of birth: 10-Aug-47
Date of death: DOW March 22, 1968
Home of record: Detroit Michigan
Status: KIA

AWARDS AND CITATIONS

Distinguished Service Cross


Awarded for actions during the Vietnam War

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Private First Class Julius Maddox (ASN: 54968086), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. Private First Class Maddox distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 February 1968 as medical aidman of an infantry company on a search and destroy operation near Hoi An. While crossing an open, dry rice paddy, his unit was hit by devastating fire from enemy soldiers entrenched in camouflaged positions within two meters of the friendly forces. The ravaging small arms and machine gun barrage killed or wounded many of the men in his platoon during the initial moments of the ambush, and the remainder of the friendly force withdrew to the concealment offered by a nearby cane field. With complete disregard for his welfare, Private Maddox sprinted across the bare terrain under a hail of fire to reach a wounded comrade and carry him to safety. Seeing a fellow medic hit, he returned through withering enemy machine gun fire to move the man to a helicopter evacuation landing zone. When the rescue ships arrived, he placed his patients aboard, secured a litter from one of the crews, and returned to aid soldiers still trapped in the deadly killing zone. He was shot in both legs by North Vietnamese fire, but ignored his wounds to carry another casualty to the waiting aircraft. He was urged to board the helicopter for evacuation, but he refused any aid for himself and returned to rescue more wounded. Only when he was certain that all his injured comrades were safe did he allow treatment and evacuation for himself. His courageous and selfless actions in the heat of battle were directly responsible for saving the lives of several fellow soldiers. Private First Class Maddox's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

General Orders: Headquarters, U.S. Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2555 (May 29, 1968)

Action Date: 6-Feb-68

Service: Army

Rank: Private First Class

Company: Headquarters Company

Battalion: 1st Battalion

Regiment: 14th Infantry Regiment

Division: 4th Infantry Division
read more read less
POSTED ON 1.30.2014
POSTED BY: Curt Carter ccarter02@earthlink.net

Remembering An American Hero

Dear PFC Julius Maddox, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
read more read less
POSTED ON 12.30.2009
POSTED BY: Robert Sage

We Remember

Julius is buried at Detroit Memorial Park Cemetery in Warren, Mich. PH
read more read less
POSTED ON 10.30.2007
POSTED BY: CLAY MARSTON

IN REMEMBRANCE OF THIS MOST HEROIC UNITED STATES ARMY SERVICEMAN A POSTHUMOUS RECIPIENT OF THE DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS WHOSE NAME SHALL LIVE FOREVER MORE


PRIVATE FIRST CLASS

JULIUS MADDOX


who served as a

COMBAT MEDIC

with


HEADQUARTERS & HEADQUARTERS COMPANY

1st BATTALION

14th INFANTRY REGIMENT

" GOLDEN DRAGONS "

" RIGHT OF THE LINE "

4th INFANTRY DIVISION

" STEADFAST AND LOYAL "


was posthumously awarded the


DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS

PURPLE HEART

NATIONAL DEFENSE SERVICE MEDAL

VIETNAM SERVICE MEDAL

REPUBLIC OF VIETNAM CAMPAIGN SERVICE MEDAL


and was entitled to wear the


COMBAT MEDIC BADGE



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



CITATION FOR POSTHUMOUS AWARD OF

THE SILVER STAR


JULIUS MADDOX

Private First Class, U.S. Army

Headquarters Company
1st Battalion
14th Infantry Regiment
4th Infantry Division

Date of Action: February 6, 1968

The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to Julius Maddox, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. Private First Class Maddox distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 February 1968 as medical aidman of an infantry company on a search and destroy operation near Hoi An. While crossing an open, dry rice paddy, his unit was hit by devastating fire from enemy soldiers entrenched in camouflaged positions within two meters of the friendly forces. The ravaging small arms and machine gun barrage killed or wounded many of the men in his platoon during the initial moments of the ambush, and the remainder of the friendly force withdrew to the concealment offered by a nearby cane field. With complete disregard for his welfare, Private Maddox sprinted across the bare terrain under a hail of fire to reach a wounded comrade and carry him to safety. Seeing a fellow medic hit, he returned through withering enemy machine gun fire to move the man to a helicopter evacuation landing zone. When the rescue ships arrived, he placed his patients aboard, secured a litter from one of the crews, and returned to aid soldiers still trapped in the deadly killing zone. He was shot in both legs by North Vietnamese fire, but ignored his wounds to carry another casualty to the waiting aircraft. He was urged to board the helicopter for evacuation, but he refused any aid for himself and returned to rescue more wounded. Only when he was certain that all his injured comrades were safe did he allow treatment and evacuation for himself. His courageous and selfless actions in the heat of battle were directly responsible for saving the lives of several fellow soldiers. Private First Class Maddox's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.





THE PROUD YOUNG VALOR THAT ROSE ABOVE THE MORTAL

AND THEN, AT LAST, WAS MORTAL AFTER ALL






YOU ARE NOT FORGOTTEN

NOR SHALL YOU EVER BE







14 February 1999
22 November 2002





read more read less