TERRY L BAXTER
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HONORED ON PANEL 47E, LINE 58 OF THE WALL

TERRY LEE BAXTER

WALL NAME

TERRY L BAXTER

PANEL / LINE

47E/58

DATE OF BIRTH

07/06/1946

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG TRI

DATE OF CASUALTY

04/04/1968

HOME OF RECORD

MARATHON

COUNTY OF RECORD

Monroe County

STATE

FL

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SP5

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR TERRY LEE BAXTER
POSTED ON 7.17.2018

4 April 1968

I was a Huey crew chief in the same aviation section as Terry. H&H 2nd Bde 1st Air Cav.My ship flew a C&C mission for the 1/5 Cav a (Col Runkle) on 3 April 1968. We were flying low level when an AK-47 opened up on us. We took 2 rounds and made back to base. My ship was red x and could not fly. The next day,the 4th of April Terrys ship got the same mission with the 1/5 Cav.They were shot down with only one survivor. All these years later I have felt terrible about that day. I would have been on that mission had we not taken the rounds the day before. RIP Terry.I tried to find his parents in Marathon Fl with no luck. Just wanted to say sorry for their loss and that I knew Terry.Ron Lauer,Fort Myers FL.
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POSTED ON 12.28.2016
POSTED BY: Lucy Conte Micik

Remembered

DEAR SPEC 5 BAXTER,
THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE AS A HUEY - UH-1 HELICOPTER REPAIRER WITH THE 1ST CAVALRY. THIS WAS THE UNIT OF A FRIEND'S TWIN. SAY HI TO MIKE. CHRISTMAS IS HERE.AND WE ARE THANKFUL FOR YOU. THE NEW YEAR IS JUST AROUND THE CORNER, WHICH MAKES IT FAR TOO LONG FOR YOU TO HAVE BEEN GONE. WATCH OVER THE U.S.A., IT STILL NEEDS YOUR COURAGE.. GOD BLESS YOU. MAY THE SAINTS AND ANGELS BE AT YOUR SIDE. REST IN PEACE.
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POSTED ON 7.7.2016
POSTED BY: Dennis Wriston

I'm proud of our Vietnam Veterans

Specialist Four Terry Lee Baxter, Served with the Aviation Section, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Brigade, 1st Calvary Division.
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POSTED ON 11.18.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter ccarter02@earthlink.net

Remembering An American Hero

Dear SP5 Terry Lee Baxter, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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POSTED ON 4.7.2013

Final Mission of U.S. Army helicopter UH-1H tail number 66-16952

There are two accounts for this incident: First Account - Operation Pegasus in 1968 was directed at lifting the siege of the Marine combat base at Khe Sanh in western Quang Tri Province. The 1st Cavalry Division was tasked with conducting the operation, and CG 1st Cavalry received operational control of the 1st Marines, the 26th Marines, and the ARVN 3rd Airborne Task Force as well as holding command over his own divisional forces. The operational plan involved thrusts along Highway 9 from Ca Lu, east of Khe Sanh, and air assaults by three battalions of the 2nd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, on the high ground north and south of Hwy 9. The command helicopter for a 15 Cavalry troop insertion on 4 April 1968 came from HHC, 2nd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. Six men are known to have been aboard UH-1H tail number 66-16952 and to have died when it was shot down: WO1 Ronald G. Phears, pilot, HHC, 2nd Bde; WO1 Joe M. Moran, copilot, HHC, 2nd Bde; SP5 Terry L. Baxter, crew chief, HHC, 2nd Bde; PFC Charlie B. Thomas, gunner, HHC, 2nd Bde; LTC Robert L. Runkle, Commanding Officer, 15th Cavalry; CAPT David A. Peters, Forward Observer, C Btry, 1st Bn, 77th Arty. There was one survivor. Second Account - COMMENT RECEIVED from AL JOHNSON: 'CAPT Joseph Lyttle was C Company commander (15 Cavalry) the summer and fall of 1967. Then he served on LTC Runkle's battalion staff until the day Runkle was killed. Lyttle was selected by Runkle to replace a wounded company CO (CAPT Robert M. Nawrosky, who died of wounds July 6, 1968) and he was on the flight that was shot down with Runkle. Lyttle survived the crash, but was partly under the helicopter. The NVA executed all others, including Runkle, but thought Lyttle was dead. He was later rescued but was permanently paralyzed from the waist down. Lyttle worked many years at Warm Springs, GA as a supervisor in rehab with other paralyzed persons, but left there last fall to retire to Virginia knowing that he was terminal with cancer.' (From Ken Davis, June 2005) [Taken from vhpa.org]

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