KARL F LANGE
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HONORED ON PANEL 15W, LINE 42 OF THE WALL

KARL FERDINAND LANGE

WALL NAME

KARL F LANGE

PANEL / LINE

15W/42

DATE OF BIRTH

11/27/1929

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG NGAI

DATE OF CASUALTY

12/09/1969

HOME OF RECORD

WEST ALLIS

COUNTY OF RECORD

Milwaukee County

STATE

WI

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

LTC

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR KARL FERDINAND LANGE
POSTED ON 11.10.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear LTC Karl Ferdinand Lange, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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POSTED ON 12.16.2012
POSTED BY: Robert Sage

We remember

Karl is buried at Arlington National Cemetery. LM BSM-2OLC ARCOM-OLC PH

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POSTED ON 4.23.2008
POSTED BY: Thomas N. Padden

My last Battalion Commander

LTC Lange was the Commander of the 1st Bn, 18th Infantry of the 1st Infantry Division, Big Red One. He became the commander in approximately January of 1969. I was a platoon leader with Charlie Company. Soon I was reassigned as the executive officer of the Company and my Company Commander, Milton Menjivar was wounded and I was elevated to temporary CO. As this point I worked directly for LTC Lange.

He had a booming voice and was in great shape for an old man. He was 39. He had been in VN at least one tour prior to his service with the Big Red One. He was a very aggressive leader and set a great example in his work load. Frequently he would be up all night monitoring the needs of his company's on patrol or night ambushes. We operated out of a Fire Base a few mile North of Di An near Highway 13. LTC Lange kept the pressure on the enemy with constant patrols and air insertions into likely enemy havens. He was also imaginative and sought the ideas of others in planning missions. He set a leadership example that I have tried to copy in business. He was nurturing and compassionate but was tough guy if the situation required it. There was truly No Mission too Difficult and No Sacrifice too great with Karl Lange.

LTC Lange liked the way I commanded as the temporary commander and when Captain Menjivar returned to the company from the hospital, LTC Lange called General Talbot, the Division Commander and requested that I be given a command. I was soon moved to the 2nd of the 2nd Infantry which was located all the way north on Highway 13 at the Cambodian border. The 2nd of the 2nd was a mechanized infantry unit and because I had been a straight leg with the 1st of the 18th, I was assigned back as a platoon leader. LTC Lange discovered this, complained to General Talbot and said that he didn't send one of his best officers off to be demoted in responsibility. I was plucked out of a fire fight to return to the 1st of 18th. Karl Lange endeared himself to me forever with that action. I was given command of the HHC of the 1st of the 18th.

In August of 1969 I left the Army to return to college in California. Later that year I was quite upset when I heard that Karl Lange had been killed in a helicopter crash in his last month or two of his tour in VN . What also disappointed me is that his death had occurred while he was in his rear job (not as a line commander) and he had been transferred out of the Big Red One. Karl Lange's name, one of the best battalion commander ever in the Big Red One is not among the list of names of the Division's distinguished members who gave the ultimate sacrifice.

LTC Lange I will never forget you and I cherish the picture of you pinning on the Silver Star on my chest. Rest in Pease, Sir!

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POSTED ON 1.18.2007
POSTED BY: Andy Bittner

For My Godfather

To me and my siblings, he was Uncle Karl and he'd been away much of my young life. I have very few personal recollections of him, but as the years continue to pass, I find myself thinking of him, more and more, appreciating the sacrifice he made and feeling the loss of not having been old enough to really know him. I imagine though, he'd be very proud of his son, John Karl Lange, Eagle Scout, West Point graduate, and career Army officer. He is constantly in my prayers.
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POSTED ON 10.29.2004
POSTED BY: Cary D. Clark, Sr. SFC retired

Remembering an Outstanding Officer

I had the privelage to serve with Col. Lange as Btn Operations Sgt. While Col. Lange was a Major and Executive Officer of the 2'nd Btn. 27'th Infantry. It was a delight to serve with him. I will always remember him.
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