LEROY J KLING
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HONORED ON PANEL 30E, LINE 9 OF THE WALL

LEROY JOHN OLIVER KLING

WALL NAME

LEROY J KLING

PANEL / LINE

30E/9

DATE OF BIRTH

05/09/1947

CASUALTY PROVINCE

KONTUM

DATE OF CASUALTY

11/17/1967

HOME OF RECORD

BATON ROUGE

COUNTY OF RECORD

East Baton Rouge Parish

STATE

LA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

PFC

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR LEROY JOHN OLIVER KLING
POSTED ON 5.8.2024
POSTED BY: ANON

77

Your sacrifice is not forgotten.

HOOAH
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POSTED ON 3.7.2023
POSTED BY: John Fabris

honoring you...

Remember to save for them a place inside of you, and save one backward glance when you are leaving, for the places they can no longer go...
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POSTED ON 10.26.2021

Final Mission of PFC Leroy J. O. Kling

Dak To Base Camp was located in Kontum Province in a valley surrounded by limestone ridges in the Central Highlands of Vietnam. During September and October 1967, more than 7,000 North Vietnamese Army (NVA) troops entrenched themselves on these ridges to besiege nearby American positions. On the night of November 12, 1967, the enemy launched the first of many rocket attacks against the Dak To Airfield, firing 44 rockets. Three days later, two C-130 Hercules transport aircraft were destroyed by an NVA mortar barrage when the planes were hit on the runway turnaround area. Additional incoming mortars set the ammunition dump and fuel storage areas ablaze. Explosions continued all day and into the night. During that evening’s incoming shelling, a mortar round landed on two steel containers of C-4 plastic explosive. They detonated simultaneously, sending a fireball and mushroom cloud high above the valley, and leaving two 40-foot-deep craters. This was said to be the largest explosion to occur during the Vietnam War, reportedly knocking men off their feet over a mile away. The explosion destroyed the entire 15th Light Equipment Company compound next to the ammunition dump. Miraculously, no one was killed. One Army engineer commented, "It looked like Charlie had gotten hold of some nuclear weapons." To prevent a repetition of the mortar attack, three companies from the U.S. Army’s 3/12th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division, were ordered to take Hill 1338 (Ngok Con Kring Mountain), the dominant hill mass three and a half miles south of Dak To. For two days, the Americans struggled their way up the jungle-covered slope nicknamed “Rocket Ridge.” The troopers found an elaborate bunker complex and nine large tunnels lined with foot-thick logs, apparently used as a hospital, each connected by field telephones. They fought their way up through several enemy positions, finally reaching the summit on November 17th. The operation cost nine U.S. lives. They included PFC Jackie R. Combs, PFC Robert W. Deyo Jr., PFC Terry M. Enriquez, SP4 Robert J. Farley Sr., PFC Leroy J. O. Kling, PFC Hubert J. Payne, 1LT John W. Terrell, SGT Larry P. Thurman, and PFC Darrell D. Venenga. The fifty-nine North Vietnamese they killed belonged to the 32nd NVA Regiment. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org, gazette.com, and wikipedia.org]
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POSTED ON 1.4.2020
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear PFC Leroy Kling, Thank you for your service as an Infantryman. I researched you on your 52nd anniversary. Saying thank you isn't enough, but it is from the heart. It is the 11th Day of Christmas, Merry Christmas and happy New Year in heaven. The time passes quickly. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage, guidance and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 5.1.2018
POSTED BY: Mike Klinefelter

Mike Klinefelter

I believe that my father Mike Klinefelter served with Leroy Kling. My father wrote that his friend Leroy Kling died next to him at Hill 1338 Dak To November 1967.
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