GREG KELLER
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HONORED ON PANEL 8W, LINE 28 OF THE WALL

GREG KELLER

WALL NAME

GREG KELLER

PANEL / LINE

8W/28

DATE OF BIRTH

12/22/1950

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG NAM

DATE OF CASUALTY

07/18/1970

HOME OF RECORD

WHITTIER

COUNTY OF RECORD

Los Angeles County

STATE

CA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

MARINE CORPS

RANK

PFC

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR GREG KELLER
POSTED ON 7.18.2010
POSTED BY: A Marine

Semper Fi

Semper Fi, Marine.
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POSTED ON 6.22.2010

Los Angeles County Vietnam Veterans Memorial Highway

A portion of Sepulveda Boulevard/State Highway Route 1 in El Segundo near Los Angeles International Airport has been dedicated to the residents of Los Angeles County who served in Vietnam. This section of highway is now designated the Los Angeles County Vietnam Veterans Memorial Highway. Adopted by the California State Legislature in 2000, the highway honors the more than 350,000 California veterans who served in the Vietnam War, including the 5,822 killed or missing in action. Los Angeles County has the largest number of Vietnam veterans in California and 1,857 of its residents were killed or missing in action during that war. This memorial corridor provides a fitting and proper way for the residents of Los Angeles County to express their gratitude and appreciation for the sacrifices these Vietnam veterans have made for their country.
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POSTED ON 12.23.2008
POSTED BY: Peggy O'Neill

High School with Greg

I remember Greg from High School. While all the other boys were trying to get out of going to Vietnam, Greg couldn't wait to join the Marine Corp and go to Vietnam as soon as he graduated.
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POSTED ON 7.18.2003
POSTED BY: Donald Lytle

Thank you PFC Keller

Although we never met personally, I want to thank you Greg Keller, for your courageous and valiant service, faithful contribution, and your most holy sacrifice given to this great country of ours!

Your Spirit is alive--and strong, therefore Marine, you shall never be forgotten, nor has your death been in vain!

Again, thank you PFC Keller, for a job well done!

REST IN ETERNAL PEACE MY MARINE FRIEND


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POSTED ON 11.18.1998
POSTED BY: Roch Thornton

An account of the death of Greg Keller

A deadly lapse in security

In July, the days are blistering hot in Dien Ban District. The chronically
sleep-deprived Marines of Combined Action Platoon 2-7-2 knew we had
to get our rest early in the morning, before the sun grew too hot.

So nearly everybody found a place to sleep soon after we reached our day
site July 18 at the "Carpenter's House" alongside Highway 1.

But for some reason, I wasn't sleepy that morning. After dropping my gear on
the porch, I sat down at a table in the front room to eat a can of C-ration
peaches and write a letter to my high school history teacher.

I was still on the first page of my letter when an explosion went off outside, in
front of the house. Grabbing my M-16, I ducked out through the front door
along with several others. I saw Greg Keller lying on his back in the middle of
the house's gravel and dirt front yard, a few feet from where he had been
sleeping. A haze of dust and smoke hung in the air.

Doc Doggett was the first to reach Greg and, after checking the area for
attackers, Ed "Mac" McIntyre and I went to help Doc. I recall Doc and Mac
facing me over Greg's body, and Doc saying, "Okay, let's turn him over."

A strange look came over Doc's face when he slid a hand under Greg's back.
I learned why when Doc and Mac carefully turned him over. His back was
gone. The skin and much of the muscle was gone from the bottom of his
shoulder blades to the middle of his buttocks. The whole area was a mass of
bleeding flesh and shattered bone, covered with dirt and bits of gravel.

Greg was still conscious at that point, but staring fixedly ahead, clearly sliding
into shock. After awhile, the only sound he made was an occasional small
grunt. Doc worked quickly and all the time we were talking to Greg, telling
him to "hang on." The flash of the explosion had burned the hair off the back
of Greg's head, and the stink of burnt hair hung about us.

Urgently Willie asked me, "Have you called a Medevac?" and I suddenly
remembered it was my job to call a rescue chopper. I had been carrying the
CAP's radio only a couple of days and had never before called a Medevac.

Willie radioed for a Medevac chopper and I stayed with Doc and Greg. Soon
Willie shouted that a chopper was inbound, and he set the radio beside me
while he went to mark an LZ on the road a few yards away. I took over
talking with the inbound Dustoff, then Doc, Mac and several others carried
Greg to the chopper, face down.

When the chopper had cleared the treetops and turned north toward Da
Nang, we all returned to the "Carpenter's House."

"I don't think he's going to make it," Doc said grimly. I agreed. I had never
seen such a massive wound. Later we learned Greg had died.

There was a small crater in the dirt, inches from the spot where Greg had been
lying on his right side. Nobody saw the attack, but it seemed likely that
someone had thrown a grenade near Greg, causing his death.

After Greg's death, CAP 2 began to formally assign at least one Marine to be
awake, alert and armed at all times in our day sites. We had never been
attacked in our day site before Greg's death, and daytime guard duty had
been an informal task, often neglected. We had gotten complacent about
daytime security, with a fatal result.

Greg had been with CAP 2 only a few weeks, so he had no close friends in
the unit. He called himself "Killer," but others had nicknamed him "Buddha"
because he cut his hair so short he looked almost bald.

Ever since that day, the smell of burnt hair has been like a slap in the face,
forcibly reminding me of July 18, 1970.

Roch Thornton
CAP 2-7-2
Thanh Quit Village
Dien Banh District
Quang Nam Province
Republic of Viet Nam
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