DICKIE G KEELER
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HONORED ON PANEL 32W, LINE 49 OF THE WALL

DICKIE GAYLE KEELER

WALL NAME

DICKIE G KEELER

PANEL / LINE

32W/49

DATE OF BIRTH

07/15/1948

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG TRI

DATE OF CASUALTY

02/17/1969

HOME OF RECORD

DEXTER

COUNTY OF RECORD

Calloway County

STATE

KY

BRANCH OF SERVICE

MARINE CORPS

RANK

LCPL

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR DICKIE GAYLE KEELER
POSTED ON 7.9.2023
POSTED BY: ANON

75

Never forgotten.

Semper Fi, Marine
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POSTED ON 3.6.2023
POSTED BY: John Fabris

We Will Remember

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning,
We will remember them.
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POSTED ON 2.22.2020

Attack on FSB Cunningham - February 17, 1969

Fire Support Base Cunningham was a U.S. Marine Corps firebase southwest of Dong Ha in central Vietnam. The base was constructed overlooking the Da Krong Valley, twenty-three miles southeast of Vandegrift Combat Base, and a half mile north of Route 922. Cunningham was established on January 25, 1969, by the 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marines in support of Operation Dewey Canyon, an operation to sweep the North Vietnamese Army–dominated A Shau and Song Da Krong Valleys. In the early morning of February 17th, a NVA sapper platoon supported by a reinforced company launched an attack on FSB Cunningham. Dressed in shorts, skullcaps, and weighted down with explosives, they broke through the defensive wire and dashed toward the center of the fire support base, tossing concussion grenades and satchel charges into every open hole. Although initially caught by surprise, the Marines of Company L, securing the fire support base, quickly organized a drive to clear the base in the face of heavy enemy mortar and recoilless rifle fire. Headquarters Battery, 2nd Battalion, 12th Marines bore the brunt of the attack, suffering major damage within the first minutes; the battalion's fire direction center was put out of action, as was one howitzer. Within 30 minutes, however, the battalion reestablished centralized fire control, and batteries continued with their missions. Throughout the night they expended 3,270 rounds on targets of opportunity, suspected assembly areas, and likely escape routes. In support, the Army of the Republic of Vietnam 105mm battery on nearby FSB Lightning unleashed reinforcing fires totaling 340 rounds. A sweep of the base and surrounding hillsides at first light revealed thirty-seven NVA bodies, thirteen of which were within the perimeter. A number of individual weapons, grenades, and packs were also located, the latter containing quantities of marijuana and other drugs. The use of narcotics, it was explained, "made them a lot harder to kill. Not one of the gooks we had inside the perimeter had less than three or four holes in him. Usually it took a grenade or something to stop him completely." Four Marines lost their lives and forty-six were wounded during the three-hour defense. The lost Marines included LCPL Dennis J. Kane, LCPL Dickie G. Keeler, CPL Donald L. Kujawa, PFC Thomas W. Sander, and LCPL Russell W. Wendler. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and “U.S. Marines in Vietnam: High Mobility and Standdown 1969” by Charles R. Smith]
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POSTED ON 11.9.2019
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Lcpl Dickie Keeler, Thank you for your service as a Machine Gunner. Saying thank you isn't enough, but it is from the heart. It is Veterans’ Day weekend. The time passes quickly. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 2.22.2014
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear LCPL Dickie Gayle Keeler, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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