LARRY A JONES
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HONORED ON PANEL 45W, LINE 53 OF THE WALL

LARRY ALLEN JONES

WALL NAME

LARRY A JONES

PANEL / LINE

45W/53

DATE OF BIRTH

10/15/1948

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG NGAI

DATE OF CASUALTY

09/06/1968

HOME OF RECORD

ST LOUIS

COUNTY OF RECORD

Gratiot County

STATE

MI

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SP4

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR LARRY ALLEN JONES
POSTED ON 1.20.2023
POSTED BY: John Fabris

We Will Remember

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning,
We will remember them.
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POSTED ON 10.16.2019
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Sp4 Larry Jones, Thank you for your service as a Medical NCO. Thank you for the lives you saved. Your 71st birthday was yesterday, happy birthday. Saying thank you isn't enough, but it is from the heart. Columbus Day just passed, and we are looking forward to Halloween. The time passes quickly. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 8.5.2019

Final Mission of SP4 Larry A. Jones

On September 5, 1968, Recon Platoon from E Company, 4th Battalion, 3rd Infantry, 11th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division, walked of LZ Buff, an Americal forward firebase southwest of Chu Lai in Quang Ngai Province, RVN, to conduct a search and destroy mission in Buff’s area of operations. Operating at full strength, the 27-man strong platoon lost two men to sniper fire on their first day, then settled in the evening on a small knoll outside of a village where they passed an uneventful night. The following day, they resumed their patrol. In the early afternoon, they exited a tree line to cross a dry rice paddy when the point element was taken under fire by an estimated battalion-sized force of North Vietnamese Army and Viet Cong. The enemy, concealed in an adjacent tree line, opened up on the exposed recon platoon with small arms and automatic weapons. Pinned down in the open field, the Americans returned fire while suffering devastating casualties as the enemy raked them with gunfire and battered them with mortar rounds. Some were able to crawl back where a slight depression in the ground afforded them a degree of concealment. Air support was requested, and tactical strikes placed by jets and helicopter gunships along with artillery fire from an adjacent firebase pounded the tree line containing the hidden enemy. The battle continued through the day, and in the evening three recon members hiding behind a dike were rescued when a helicopter landed, the troopers discarding their weapons and equipment and sprinted aboard the aircraft. Contact ended when the enemy slipped away after dark. Eleven U.S. were killed in the engagement and another four were wounded. The lost Americans included CPL Marshall J. Brown, SP4 Terrance R. Hanson, SGT James C. Holmes, SGT Edward W. Secrest, PFC Barry R. Moree, PFC Hershel E. Morrow, PFC Jerry G. Richard, CPL Floyd L. Still, PFC Rayner E. Williams, PFC Donnie R. White, and SP4 Larry A. Jones. It wasn’t until after midnight that a reaction force from Bravo Company, 4/3, arrived and swept the area, rescuing the survivors and collected the dead. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org, americal4ofthe3.com, and information provided by Jerry Drury and Russ Blais (July 2019)]
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POSTED ON 7.27.2017
POSTED BY: Bruce Flaherty

Doc

Served with Larry when we were both in D/4/3rd. Doc; YOU ARE NOT FORGOTTEN!
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POSTED ON 5.14.2014
POSTED BY: Tony Christian

A friend is just a friend until he becomes a brother...

Larry and I meet in October 1966 at Fort Knox Ky. We went through basic training in the same company. We went through training at Fort Sam Houston together in the same company. We spent months in Hawaii in the same company. We went to Vietnam together, as you can guess in the same company. I was shipped into a combat unit as a medic TDY while Larry remained in our field hospital. The night Larry came out to the field to relieve me to go on R&R as he got off the chopper I got on, September 6, 1968 the night he was killed the last thing he said to me was "get your ass back here I could get hurt out here". I will never forget the friendship shared with he and others nor will I ever feel that in some way I was partially responsible for his passing. He was a great friend, as we're many of us. The saying goes that as long as you are remembered part of you lives, he and many more that "gave all" will live in our minds and our heart. Larry we salute you and all our brothers that never got the chance to grow old with our families.
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