ROBERT E JOHNSTON JR
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HONORED ON PANEL 36E, LINE 52 OF THE WALL

ROBERT EARL JOHNSTON JR

WALL NAME

ROBERT E JOHNSTON JR

PANEL / LINE

36E/52

DATE OF BIRTH

12/21/1946

CASUALTY PROVINCE

BINH DUONG

DATE OF CASUALTY

02/01/1968

HOME OF RECORD

ALAMEDA

COUNTY OF RECORD

Alameda County

STATE

CA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SP4

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR ROBERT EARL JOHNSTON JR
POSTED ON 6.10.2021

Final Mission of SP4 Robert E. Johnston Jr.

The Tet Offensive of 1968 was a campaign of surprise attacks against military and civilian command and control centers throughout South Vietnam. The offensive was countrywide and well-coordinated with more than 80,000 North Vietnamese Army and Viet Cong troops striking over 100 towns and cities, including 36 of 44 provincial capitals, five of the six autonomous cities, 72 of 245 district towns, and the capital of Saigon. On the morning of February 1st, a reinforced Viet Cong battalion struck the district headquarters north of the capital at Phu Cuong and the Army of the Republic of Vietnam (ARVN) Engineer School just west of town. Because of the Tet holidays, the school was defended by only eighty-seven ARVN soldiers and four American advisers. By 7:00 AM, the enemy had overrun the northern half of the facility. If the school fell, the Viet Cong would dominate the high ground, which overlooked a bridge site where men of the 41st Port Construction Company and Company B, 92nd Engineer Construction Battalion were building a steel and concrete bypass viaduct over the Saigon River. The school troops were outnumbered and low on ammunition, and casualties were mounting. A request for help from the American senior adviser went to the engineers at the bridge site, and twenty-five men in a makeshift platoon were sent to the school. Guided by the advisers and aided by an air strike, the engineers counterattacked and drove the enemy back. Soon afterward, a South Vietnamese tank-infantry force arrived, and the Viet Cong were evicted from the school grounds. The U.S. engineers suffered two killed and several wounded. The lost personnel included electrician SP4 Robert E. Johnston Jr. and construction worker PFC Roger D. Puckett. Johnston was posthumously awarded the Silver Star medal gallantry. Less than forty-eight hours later, while fighting was still going on, the engineers were back at work on the bridge. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and “Engineers at War” by Adrian G. Traas]
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POSTED ON 10.8.2019
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Sp4 Robert Johnston, Thank you for your service as an Electrician. Saying thank you isn't enough, but it is from the heart. It's almost Columbus Day. The time passes quickly. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 1.22.2019
POSTED BY: Tom

SPECIALIST ROBERT JOHNSTON

I WISH TO EXTEND MY SINCEREST CONDOLENCES TO THE FAMILY AND FRIENDS. MAY YOU AND FAMILY REST IN ETERNAL PEACE!

FORMER MEMBER OF THE 41ST ENGR CO. 1967.
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POSTED ON 5.28.2018
POSTED BY: Annetta Martinez-Jordan

Robert E.Johnston Jr.

How I have missed you for the past 50 years I know you have been protecting me through the years for all of the close calls I have had. I still love you as much today as I did then, I miss you and hope to see you when my time comes.
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POSTED ON 11.8.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear SP4 Robert Earl Johnston Jr, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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