STEPHEN L IRVIN
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HONORED ON PANEL 26E, LINE 46 OF THE WALL

STEPHEN LEE IRVIN

WALL NAME

STEPHEN L IRVIN

PANEL / LINE

26E/46

DATE OF BIRTH

07/25/1947

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG TIN

DATE OF CASUALTY

09/10/1967

HOME OF RECORD

COLUMBIA

COUNTY OF RECORD

Boone County

STATE

MO

BRANCH OF SERVICE

MARINE CORPS

RANK

CPL

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR STEPHEN LEE IRVIN
POSTED ON 2.17.2014
POSTED BY: David Harbin

I helped recover H 2/5's KIA's on Operation Swift, including Steve.

I was a rifleman with Hotel Company on Operation Swift when Steve died on 9/10/67. He was attached that day to the 1st platoon as a rocket squad leader (they carried and fired LAAW rockets). I was a member of the 3rd platoon. On that day the company passed through an NVA fortified village which had been the site of heavy combat several days earlier between Marines of another unit and the NVA. It was real spooky passing through the village-lots of collapsed trenches and burned out huts-but no sign of the NVA. I still remember thinking at that time they were watching us but as we were a full company they did not want to engage us. About a mile past the village we stopped to receive a resupply via chopper. Captain Bowers decided to send the 1st platoon on a security patrol while the rest of the company safeguarded the LZ. The patrol route caused it to pass through the aforementioned village. The platoon leader was Lt. Allan Joseph Herman who also died with Steve that day. The 1st platoon were in a rice paddy and were near the edge of the village when the NVA opened up on them. The NVA had reoccupied their trenches after the entire Company had earlier swept through it. And, of course, the NVA were now engaging a single platoon-not an entire company and the NVA force had to have been at least a full company of NVA regulars. And the NVA were dug in and the Marines were out in an open rice paddy that afforded virtually no cover aside from some bomb craters. Steve died with 8 others of our 1st platoon that day. The rest of the company immediately saddled up once word was received the 1st platoon had been ambushed. Once we got to the site, fighting raged for most of the remaining daylight. Any one trying to retrieve our dead would have been killed instantly so upon darkness the company set up in another village maybe a couple meters from the ambush site. There was a lot of fighting that night too, especially when the medevac choppers came in for our wounded and the NVA opened up on them. How they did not get shot down was a miracle. At dawn, Captain Bowers asked for volunteers to brave the enemy fire so we could bring Steve and the others back into our lines so they could be taken out by chopper. I was one of the volunteers and was the first to come upon Steve who was leaning against a rice paddy dike with an incredibly serene look on his face. I thought he was asleep at first. He no doubt had died instantly and could not have felt much pain. I also recovered the body of Martin Rosales who lay near Steve. Steve probably was tending to Martin when Steve was hit. My memory of Steve was that he was extremely well liked and respected by everyone in the Company. He was always squared away and was fun to be around. I liked him a lot and was struck how handsome he was. He could have been on a recruiting poster. He, of course, is guarding Heaven's streets along with all his other brothers who wore the Eagle, Globe, and Anchor and died defending freedom. Semper Fi, Steve. David Harbin, H 2/5.
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POSTED ON 2.11.2014
POSTED BY: CARL SMITH

TOUGH MARINE- GOOD FRIEND

STEVE GRADUATED FROM HICKMAN HIGH SCHOOL IN 1965. WE WERE A LITTLE " WILD" IN SCHOOL AND HAD A LOT OF FUN
,
FROM THE CLASS OF '65 ONLY 5 JOINED THE MARINE CORPS
.
4 WERE IN VIET NAM AT SAME TIME, IN THE SAME UNIT, ON THE SAME OPERATION, (OPERATION SWIFT) . TWO WERE KILLED (DANNY HEIBEL kia) ON THIS SAME OPERATION.

SEMPER FI
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POSTED ON 1.27.2014
POSTED BY: Bob Lewis

Steven L. Irwin

Steve and I were classmates from 1958-1961. He is one of those guys that you always wanted on your team. He was ONE tough !! I last saw him after basic training and shred a few beers at Hulen's Lake. He was a true Marine and I will always treasure him.
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POSTED ON 9.13.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter

Remembering An American Hero

Dear CPL Stephen Lee Irvin, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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POSTED ON 9.10.2013
POSTED BY: A Marine, USMC, Vietnam

Silver Star Citation (full)

Silver Star


Awarded for actions during the Vietnam War

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Stephen L. Irvin (MCSN: 2305659), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Rocket Squad Leader with Company H, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam on 10 September 1967. During Operation SWIFT Corporal Irvin's platoon came under intense automatic weapons and small arms fire from a solidly entrenched, numerically superior North Vietnamese Army force. Corporal Irvin fearlessly moved about the fire-swept battlefield directing deadly rocket fire into the fortified enemy positions, accounting for the silencing of at least one enemy machine gun position. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, he continued his aggressive actions until his ordnance was totally expended. Upon depletion of his ammunition, he turned to aid his fallen comrades. He exposed himself to intense enemy fire in the open rice paddy while dragging wounded Marines to covered positions on two occasions. On his third evacuation trip across the fire-swept ride paddy, he was mortally wounded. By his bold initiative, dauntless courage and indomitable fighting spirit, Corporal Irvin reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Action Date: September 10, 1967

Service: Marine Corps

Rank: Corporal

Company: Company H

Battalion: 2d Battalion

Regiment: 5th Marines

Division: 1st Marine Division (Rein.), FMF
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