LEO J HORAN
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HONORED ON PANEL 5E, LINE 47 OF THE WALL

LEO JOSEPH HORAN

WALL NAME

LEO J HORAN

PANEL / LINE

5E/47

DATE OF BIRTH

04/20/1933

CASUALTY PROVINCE

PR & MR UNKNOWN

DATE OF CASUALTY

02/18/1966

HOME OF RECORD

MAYNARD

COUNTY OF RECORD

Middlesex County

STATE

MA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SP5

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR LEO JOSEPH HORAN
POSTED ON 7.14.2019
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Sp5 Leo Horan, Thank you for your service as a Food Service Specialist. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 7.1.2014
POSTED BY: Dr. Ray Horan

My Father

My father (and his 2 brothers) were all Korean War vets. He had a "soldier's feeling" he wasn't coming back from Vietnam. He told his brother, and told me as he was packing his duffel bag at Fort Riley, Kansas. I was in the third grade in September 1965. He told me "to take care of your mother and sisters, I don't think I'm coming back, I have a soldier's feeling." I asked him, "Why don't you run away?" He responded, "The Army will shoot me." He went and did his duty, it still haunts me almost 50 years later.

*This photo was taken in Vietnam approximately ten days before his death.
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POSTED ON 1.15.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter

Remembering an American Hero

Dear SP5 Leo Joseph Horan, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for the ultimate sacrifice that you made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. And please know that men and women like you have stepped forward to defend our country yet again, showing the same love for country and their fellow Americans that you did- you would be proud.

With respect, and the best salute that a civilian can muster for you.

Curt Carter

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POSTED ON 10.23.2012
POSTED BY: Bill C

A Memorial Day Speach in his hometown of Maynard Mass.

There are 45 names on this memorial. 45 men with ties to Maynard who gave their lives while serving in the armed forces during WWI, WWII, the Korean War and the Vietnam War.



I don’t know any of those men personally, but I wanted to learn something more about them. I’d like to share with you what I learned about two of these men, and what I learned about some other soldiers in the process.



The two men are Robert Bennett Emro and Leo Joseph Horan. Those two names caught my eye because they are listed twice on the brass plaques that surround this little park. They are on the honor role for the Korean War and are among the ones who made it home safely. They are also on the honor role for the Vietnam War, their gold stars indicating that they gave their lives in their second war.




Robert Bennett Emro joined the Army at age 20, prior to the start of the Korean War. He served for 18 years and rose to the rank of Platoon Sergeant. He went to Vietnam in September of 1966. Seven months later he was killed in action leading his platoon.



He died on April 18, 1967 and was one of 13 soldiers, marines and navy personnel who died in Vietnam that day. That was a typical day in Vietnam.



Leo Joseph Horan joined the army when he was 19 years old. He served for 14 years and rose to the rank of Specialist 5. He went to Vietnam in October of 1965 and died in combat on February 18, 1966.



He was one of 30 soldiers, marines, and navy airman who died that day.



- Among those who died that same day was a 19-year-old marine PFC from Los Angeles and a 40-year-old Army Lt. Colonel from Georgia. Their names are William Rigg and Charles Honour.


- Army Specialist 4 Bob Brumley died that day. It was the last day of his 12 month tour in Vietnam.


- Lieutenant JG Thomas Schroeffel died that day. He was a Navy airman flying his first mission in Vietnam. His body has yet to be recovered.


- Army Second Lieutenants Carol Ann Drazba and Elizabeth Ann Jones died that day in a helicopter crash that claimed 7 lives. They were the first military women killed in Vietnam.



Those are just a few of the people who died on February 18, 1966, and just 7 of the one million soldiers, sailors, marines, air force and coast guard personnel who have died while serving their country.



Each deserves to be remembered and today we are doing that. All around the country there are people like you who are marching in parades, placing flags at grave sites, and observing quiet personal remembrances. Thank you all for being part of that and thank you all for remembering.


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POSTED ON 6.6.2009
POSTED BY: Bill C

His Resting Place

He lies in the small cemetary at the old Fort Devens post in Massachusetts. Next to him lies his 7 year old daughter, who passed away three months after his death.
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