KARL D HEZEL
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HONORED ON PANEL 30E, LINE 9 OF THE WALL

KARL D HEZEL

WALL NAME

KARL D HEZEL

PANEL / LINE

30E/9

DATE OF BIRTH

12/08/1933

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG TRI

DATE OF CASUALTY

11/17/1967

HOME OF RECORD

CRANFORD

COUNTY OF RECORD

Union County

STATE

NJ

BRANCH OF SERVICE

AIR FORCE

RANK

MAJ

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR KARL D HEZEL
POSTED ON 7.9.2023
POSTED BY: Victor Bary

Karl Dieter Hezel

This is addressed to Steve Burton who recently left a posting about Maj Karl Dieter Hezel. I am writing an article about Major Hezel for the Cranford86 - a group dedicated to researching, writing, publishing, and recognizing on Memorial Day the 86 Cranford, NJ resident who died in wartime service. please contact me at [email protected].
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POSTED ON 6.1.2023
POSTED BY: Steve Burton

A Close Friend

Today at 3 PM, PDT, I had a moment of silence and thought about one person in particular who gave his life for our country. His name was Karl T. Hezel – Karl was from Philadelphia PA. I first met Karl at Ellington AFB, Houston Texas, in January of 1957. We were in the same Navigator training class and likely had been in San Antonio in December, at Lackland AFB but never met. Like I, Karl was married – his wife Fran and my wife Marnell became friends off-base. We lived in the same, apartment complex in Houston. Karl and I and two other classmates carpooled for the daily trip to Ellington. In class and off-base the Hezels and Burtons often socialized – often quite an amusing time, as the Hezels constant companions were their two Weimaraners. Like I, Karl was accepted into ECM (Electronic Counter Measures) School after getting our navigator wings – classmates again, but now at Kessler AFB in Biloxi Mississippi. ECM was a six-month school and an additional, upgraded aeronautical rating if you graduated. The majority of the graduates went directly into SAC (The Strategic Air Command) – and would probably join a crew in a B52. Karl and I had the same class schedule, and often flew training missions together – twice to Ramey AFB in Puerto Rico. Like Karl I expected to go to SAC, but was offered a position as a teacher at the school – 5-week course in basic electronic systems. Karl went into SAC – first station, ironically, Larsen AFB, Moses Lake, WA. We kept in touch – I even remember him telling me what fun it was to be on a crew and he even relished the times they spent hours together practicing getting for the signal (siren, most likely) to take off for a mission when war broke out. I got out of the Air Force just before the end of 1959. Karl put in for a ‘regular commission’ in early 1959 and began his career. Then came Viet Nam. By then Karl was a Major and ECM Officer on a B52 Squadron. To this day I remember getting the call from Fran. We were living in Columbus Indiana. Karl’s fully loaded plane, flying from a base in Thailand, crashed on a bombing mission to North Viet Nam. Karl would have never called himself a hero. His strict German family background wouldn’t have allowed. But he was, and I remember him on this Memorial Day 2023. One of the most emotional days of my life was in Washington D.C. several years ago. I found Karl’s name on the Viet Nam Memorial wall. Then too, I had a moment of silent prayer as I placed my hand on him.
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POSTED ON 12.1.2022
POSTED BY: John Fabris

honoring you...

Remember to save for them a place inside of you, and save one backward glance when you are leaving, for the places they can no longer go...
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POSTED ON 2.15.2020

Final Mission of MAJ Karl D. Hezel

On the morning of November 17, 1967, a U.S. Air Force Douglas EB-66C Destroyer from the 41st Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron, 355th Tactical Fighter Wing, departed Takhli Royal Thai Air Force Base for a mission over North Vietnam. Shortly after takeoff, the right engine failed, and the pilot, MAJ Max E. Nichols, performed his engine out procedures and prepared the aircraft and the crew for an emergency landing at Takhli. While the jet was on short final, it descended rapidly into rough ground about 1200 feet short of the runway, slid for a distance, caught fire, and exploded. Only two of the seven crewmen were able to escape the burning aircraft. The lost crew included MAJ Nichols, electronic warfare officers CAPT Rey L. Duffin and MAJ Karl D. Hezel, and navigators MAJ William McDonald and 1LT Theodore W. Johnson. The EB-66 reportedly had a history of engine problems. At or near max weight, hot climate, and the fact that the aircraft was very hard to control with one engine made a successful engine-out takeoff and landing a slim prospect. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org, aviation-safety.net, and togetherweserved.com]
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POSTED ON 5.29.2019
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Major Karl Hezel, Thank you for your service as an Electronic Warfare Officer. It was just Memorial Day when we honor you. I could not post then because this site was overwhelmed. Please watch over the USA, it still needs your courage. Rest in peace with the angels.
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