CALVIN D GUNTER
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HONORED ON PANEL 3W, LINE 94 OF THE WALL

CALVIN DOUGLAS GUNTER

WALL NAME

CALVIN D GUNTER

PANEL / LINE

3W/94

DATE OF BIRTH

08/26/1949

CASUALTY PROVINCE

KONTUM

DATE OF CASUALTY

06/29/1971

HOME OF RECORD

FAIRFAX

COUNTY OF RECORD

City Of Fairfax

STATE

VA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SP4

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR CALVIN DOUGLAS GUNTER
POSTED ON 5.30.2022
POSTED BY: Cindy Gunter

Fifty one years gone by

It’s been 51 years since the day you were taken away but still a part of me is still that teenager waiting for her big brother to walk in the door. When we lost you we lost so much life still to give. You are missed.
Love,Cindy
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POSTED ON 7.8.2021
POSTED BY: Jeff Logan

Served together

We served in the same platoon of B/29th, Pleiku, VN. I was at the SF compound in Kontum when word came down, sorry he missed life, war really is destructive.
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POSTED ON 7.8.2021
POSTED BY: Jeff Logan

Served together

We served in the same platoon of B/29th, Pleiku, VN. I was at the SF compound in Kontum when word came down, sorry he missed life, war really is destructive.
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POSTED ON 3.19.2020

Ground Casualty

CPL Harry T. Walton Jr., SP4 Calvin D. Gunther, and SP4 Mason A. Keith were crewman on a M42 “Duster,” a twin 40mm self-propelled anti-aircraft gun that was primarily used by U.S. forces in Vietnam in a ground defense role. The three served with B Battery, 4th Battalion, 60th Artillery, 41st Artillery Group. In late June 1971, their unit was helping guard Tan Canh Base Camp, a former U.S. Army and Army of the Republic of Vietnam (ARVN) firebase northwest of Kon Tum in the Central Highlands near the Laotian border. Walton, Gunther, and Keith shared in the responsibility for perimeter defense, and on the 29th they came together in one of the guard towers on base to perform this task. Another thing the three men shared was a drug habit, and while on guard duty they smoked heroin. This was not unusual as the use of heroin by American troops in Vietnam had reached epidemic proportions in 1971. Reportedly, one of the soldiers told Keith he could not go back to the U.S. because he had a virulent case of VD. Keith allegedly used his M16 rifle to kill the others, emptied a belt of ammo from the M60 machine gun located on the guard tower, firing over the firebase, then emptied the remainder of the clip in his M16 on his groin area, bleeding out almost immediately. After the casualties were brought down from the tower, they were flown to the 14th Medical Detachment at Pleiku. An Army CID unit came out to the remote firebase and conducted an investigation, interviewing several persons. No memorial service was held for the lost crewmembers, and the episode was soon quietly forgotten. A local paper in Walton’s hometown reported that his death occurred while guarding POW’s when another GI went berserk, killing Walton and the prisoners, then himself. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and information provided by Gene Bolling (March 2020); also “G.I. Heroin Addiction Epidemic in Vietnam.” The New York Times, May 16, 1971; and “Local Man Murdered In Vietnam.” Herald Leader (Lexington, KY), July 4, 1971]
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POSTED ON 2.22.2019
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Sp4 Calvin Gunter,
Thank you for your service as a Field Illumination Crewman. It has been too long, and it's about time for us all to acknowledge the sacrifices of those like you who answered our nation's call. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
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