RICHARD J GRAY
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HONORED ON PANEL 3W, LINE 74 OF THE WALL

RICHARD JOSEPH GRAY

WALL NAME

RICHARD J GRAY

PANEL / LINE

3W/74

DATE OF BIRTH

10/04/1946

CASUALTY PROVINCE

PR & MR UNKNOWN

DATE OF CASUALTY

06/13/1971

HOME OF RECORD

SALEM

COUNTY OF RECORD

Essex County

STATE

MA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

1LT

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR RICHARD JOSEPH GRAY
POSTED ON 1.24.2019
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Lt Richard Gray,
Thank you for your service as a Field Artillery Unit Commander. It has been too long, and it's about time for us all to acknowledge the sacrifices of those like you who answered our nation's call. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 1.15.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter

Remembering an American Hero

Dear 1LT Richard Joseph Gray, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for the ultimate sacrifice that you made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. And please know that men and women like you have stepped forward to defend our country yet again, showing the same love for country and their fellow Americans that you did- you would be proud.

With respect, and the best salute that a civilian can muster for you.

Curt Carter

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POSTED ON 5.23.2011
POSTED BY: Phillip Gray

I would like to honor 1st Lt. Richard Gray

I would like to honor 1st Lt. Richard Gray, 7th BN 15th Field Artillery. Lt. Gray, no relation just the same last name, was the night duty officer for the battery where I was assigned as a medic. Lt. Gray had finished undergrad work and decided to do his military service before continuing on to Law School. He had left behind his young fiancé when he was sent to Vietnam. A medic is a boring job, for the most part, unless of course you are under attack, so Lt. Gray and I had many talks and he became my friend. In June, 1971 our compound was hit with rocket fire and Lt. Gray, along with 23 other men, were severely injured. Lt. Gray had been hit in the back of the head by a piece of shrapnel. When I arrived to treat Lt Gray's wounds I heard another round coming in, picked him up, threw him in a foxhole, then dove in after him. I treated his head wound, trying to get the dirt out, and left him with another man as I had several other people that needed my help. As the only medic for 145 men, I had to stretch myself thin to treat each man. After the attack was over, while waiting for the MediVacs to arrive, I tried to check on each man, including Lt. Gray. I looked into the foxhole where I left my friend and ask 'Lt, is there anything I can do for you'. Lt. Gray looked up at me, knowing, in my belief, that he was dying and said, 'Don't worry about me, Doc, go help the men, they need you more than I do'. Once the MediVacs arrived I put 12 men on one chopper, including Lt. Gray. The only way you can get 12 litter patients on one chopper is to stack human bodies, which I did, including my friend Lt. Gray. 24 hours later I received the news that Lt. Gray had died from his injuries. The first of my men, my friends, that I was unable to save. Lt. Gray, like many others had paid the ultimate price for freedom. Lt. Gray, facing his own death, was more concerned about his men that he was about his own life. In my book, this makes Lt. Gray one of the great HEROES and I carry his memory with me for these past 40 years.

I would like to dedicate my poem 'Medic' (http:www.phwgray.fatcow.commedic.html)to my friend Lt. Richard Gray, 7th Bn 15th Field Artillery, Pleiku Vietnam, whose sacrifice and bravery show the highest dedication of our fallen heroes. I ask everyone to remember Lt. Gray and to raise a glass in his honor for his sacrifice, dedication, and bravery along with all the other brave men and women we as Medics were unable to save. I ask one and all to take a moment to remember Lt. Gray and all the other men and women that have paid the highest price for Freedom.

Lt. Richard Gray, you have not been forgotten, you live in my memory
FOREVER.....
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POSTED ON 11.2.2009
POSTED BY: Tom

Thank you

We served together, and I remember the day you died and the battery grieved. I remember you as a fellow officer, but, more as one from whom I learned a great deal about working with people. I call you now my friend and brother.
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POSTED ON 6.13.2005
POSTED BY: Bob Ross

Do not stand at my grave and weep

Do not stand at my grave and weep.
I am not there; I do not sleep.
I am a thousand winds that blow,
I am the diamond glints on snow,
I am the sun on ripened grain,
I am the gentle autumn rain.
When you awaken in the morning's hush
I am the swift uplifting rush
Of quiet birds in circled flight.
I am the soft stars that shine at night.
Do not stand at my grave and cry,
I am not there; I did not die.

Mary Frye – 1932

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