MICHAEL F GRAMLICK
VIEW ALL PHOTOS (4)
HONORED ON PANEL 20W, LINE 56 OF THE WALL

MICHAEL F GRAMLICK

WALL NAME

MICHAEL F GRAMLICK

PANEL / LINE

20W/56

DATE OF BIRTH

06/11/1947

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG NAM

DATE OF CASUALTY

07/27/1969

HOME OF RECORD

GARDENA

COUNTY OF RECORD

Los Angeles County

STATE

CA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

MARINE CORPS

RANK

LCPL

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR MICHAEL F GRAMLICK
POSTED ON 1.19.2019
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Lcpl Michael Gramlick,
Thank you for your service as an Aircraft Electrical Systems Technician. It has been too long, and it's about time for us all to acknowledge the sacrifices of those like you who answered our nation's call. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
read more read less
POSTED ON 12.26.2017

Final Mission of LCPL Michael F. Gramlick

At 1530 hours [3:30 PM] on July 27, 1969, a U.S. Marine Corps CH-46A helicopter (#154018), YT-10, from Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron 364 (HMM 364), was on an emergency medevac mission 17 miles southwest of Da Nang, Quang Nam Province, RVN, when it was hit by hostile small arms and automatic weapons fire as it departed a pick-up zone. Disabled by the fire, YT-10 was observed by another Marine helicopter crew to attempt a landing on a plateau on top of a hill. Radio transmissions from the pilot of YT-10 indicated that he was loaded with medevacs and was suffering a hydraulic failure and flight control problems. The second crew observed YT-10 approach the hillside and abruptly drop below the rim and fly directly into the hillside. The aircraft rolled to bottom of a ravine and burst into flames. The other helicopter attempted to lower a crewman on a hoist to pick up survivors, however, burning jet fuel and ammo cooking off forced the rescue aircraft away. YT-10 completely burned in a matter of minutes. No survivors were recovered and eleven lives were lost in the incident. The lost crew of YT-10 included pilot 1LT Robert W. Armenio, co-pilot 1LT Daunt B. Sanders, crew chief CPL John T. McDaniel, gunners CPL John H. Harris Jr., GSGT Raymond Gibel, and LCPL Michael F. Gramlick, and corpsman HM1 Charles H. Hackworth. The five lost passengers were LCPL Leon R. Barickman, PFC Ronald J. Scharf, PFC Paul M. Du Charm, CPL Ralph D. Storm, and a wounded NVA soldier being transported for interrogation. CPL Storm's body was being evacuated after he was shot and killed while making a rescue attempt when the point man of his patrol was gunned down and killed. Storm received a Silver Star for his actions. LCPL Barickman was suffering from a severe leg infection and was taking the medevac back to the rear for treatment. He and PFC Du Charm were tasked with escorting the NVA prisoner on the flight. [Taken from popasmoke.com and vhpa.org]
read more read less
POSTED ON 5.29.2017

Memorial Day 2017

Mike my friend, thinking of you. In July it will be 48 years since you were killed. Fred and Dan killed two days later. You guys live on as long as we do.

Semper Fi my friend...
read more read less
POSTED ON 8.28.2016

Mike, your friends remember and honor you. Semper Fi my Friend!

Mike and I were close friends as we learned to be aircraft electricians, then practiced what we learned at Camp Pendleton. We would go up to Gardena and stay with Mike's family on the weekends. Oscar, Mike's dad, would take us out to dinner like we were part of the family too.

Mike went to HMM 364, and I went to VMO 2 in late 1968. I still recall the day I walked into the shop and learned that Mike had been shot down and killed. It was so damned painful to lose a friend like Mike! That night we all went to the EM club and shared our memories.

Mike, I wish you would have made it. We're all nearly 70 now, but as long as we are still around, you live on.
read more read less
POSTED ON 1.30.2014
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear LCPL Michael F Gramlick, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
read more read less