JOHN P GIDDINGS
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HONORED ON PANEL 46E, LINE 33 OF THE WALL

JOHN PATRICK GIDDINGS

WALL NAME

JOHN P GIDDINGS

PANEL / LINE

46E/33

DATE OF BIRTH

07/19/1948

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG TRI

DATE OF CASUALTY

03/26/1968

HOME OF RECORD

CASS CITY

COUNTY OF RECORD

Tuscola County

STATE

MI

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SP4

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR JOHN PATRICK GIDDINGS
POSTED ON 3.14.2015
POSTED BY: Richard L. Dieterle

My Friend

John Giddings and I served together as ammo bearers for the machine gun carried by Richard M. Yellen (KIA 25 Sept. 67) of the First Platoon, "A" Co., 1/8 Cav., First Air Cavalry. Giddings was shorter than average in stature, but very sturdy and capable of carrying the heavy load of machine gun ammo over every kind of terrain with no apparent difficulty. I always got along with him well, although it must be said that he could be rather pugnacious at times. He had what George Washington called "natural courage." For months, we dug the same foxholes together, and pulled alternating guard shifts through each night. Finally, he was disburdened of carrying machine gun ammo and was transferred to Sgt. Nunn's rifle squad. On 25 March, our company came into contact with a heavily armed NVA unit. We were trying to probe our way to find an angle of attack. Giddings was pulling point on such a probe, when from a bunker concealed behind vegetation, a shot rang out and Giddings fell to the ground. The squad scattered behind a string of graves which formed a series of little mounds (as the Vietnamese were buried in a sitting posture). Heavy enemy fire erupted, and efforts to pull Giddings to cover were frustrated. I was farther down the line and could not see what was happening, but was told later that Giddings simply stood up, rested his rifle on his shoulder as though he were in the rear, and started to walk towards the nearest grave. He only got a step or two when the concealed enemy soldier opened up on automatic landing a series of rounds right up his back and head. He was killed instantly. David Orwig tried to crawl out and pull his body back behind the line of graves, but as he did so, he himself was shot through the heart. His body was retrieved, but since the company was repositioned for an assault, Gidding's body could not be reclaimed until the next day. It is a profound testament to the quality of a person that another would die trying to recover his mere body.

One photo, which is a very good likeness, was shot by his friend Wayne Westenberger, and shows him seated atop a bunker probably back in '67. The other, which I shot myself, shows him leaning against the machine gun bunker at LZ Two Bits during the last week of July, 1967.
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POSTED ON 2.28.2014
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear SP4 John Patrick Giddings, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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POSTED ON 12.9.2010
POSTED BY: Robert Sage

We Remember

John is buried at Sacred Heart Cemetery, Caro,MI. AM PH
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POSTED ON 3.26.2005
POSTED BY: Dave Kruger, 196th LIB. 66-67

Not forgotten

John, Although we never met, I just want you to know you are not forgotten. You gave the ultimate sacrifice, your life for what you believed in. Sleep well and thank you.
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