RONALD L BABCOCK
VIEW ALL PHOTOS (7)
HONORED ON PANEL 4W, LINE 8 OF THE WALL

RONALD LESTER BABCOCK

WALL NAME

RONALD L BABCOCK

PANEL / LINE

4W/8

DATE OF BIRTH

10/08/1945

CASUALTY PROVINCE

LZ

DATE OF CASUALTY

02/27/1971

HOME OF RECORD

TUCSON

COUNTY OF RECORD

Pima County

STATE

AZ

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

1LT

Book a time
Contact Details
STATUS

MIA

ASSOCIATED ITEMS LEFT AT THE WALL

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR RONALD LESTER BABCOCK
POSTED ON 12.29.2001
POSTED BY: Ellen Babcock

Ron's Last Day Home--Thanksgiving Day 1970

Ronald Lester Babcock was born October 8, 1945 in Lincoln, Nebraska. Ron was six months old when we moved from Nebraskas to Denver, Colorado. His early years were spent in Florida, Kansas, and Arizona. The Babcock family moved to Tucson, Arizona in 1956.

Ron attended grade school at Cavett School, Utterback Junior High, and graduated from Rincon High School in 1963. During the summer between his Junior and Senior years at Rincon High School, he worked for
the United States Forestry Service as a Lookout for fires from the high tower. He got caught between two fires and had to be airlifted by helicopter.

Ron knew he wanted to be in the forestry service, and attended Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff. He received his BSM degree in Forestry in 1968. While in college, he received his draft notice from the
United States Army.

During the summers while in college, Ron served as a Crew Chief with the U.S. Forestry Service. He supervised a team of Native Americans in the Flagstaff area. The crew thought highly of him and made him
a blood brother. When his men learned that he had been drafted, they presented him with an Eagle feather. Among Native Americans, the Eagle is a protector and a symbol of Our Creator. It was their prayer that
the Eagle feather would be a protector to him, a white man. He was also presented with a special prayer, one that had been passed man to man upon return stateside. The prayer had been carried by several of his crew who had already completed their tours in Vietnam, and each man had returned
home safely. Ron had purchased a special knife to carry with him while in Vietnam. He spent endless hours sharpening the knife, vowing that if he were captured, he would never be taken alive. Sadly, the Eagle feather, the special
prayer, and the knife were stolen prior to Ron being shot down.

Ron completed five years of college. After graduation from NAU, Ron served ninety days at Jasper, Arkansas with the United States Forestry Service. When the U.S. Forestry Service learned that Ron was Missing-in-Action, they
informed the Babcock family that his position with the Service would be held for a period of five years.

Ron left for Vietnam on December 1, 1970. He was the pilot of an O6. He was in-country three months when the incident occurred. Ron and his Observer, Fred Mooney, were involved in a combat mission in Laos, when the chopper was hit by
heavy enemy fire by five 51mm guns. Ron and Fred were seen leaving the site of the crash.

Ron is the oldest of three children born to Lester and Ellen Marie Babcock. His younger siblings are Diana and Richard.

Ron was a credit to his family and to the United States Army.

Ron's father, Lester, passed away in 1987, while still waiting to learn of Ron's fate. Lester had served twenty-nine years in the military. He began his career with the United States Cavalry in Washington, D.C. After being discharged from the U.S. Cavalry, he later enlisted
in the United States Air Force at Bakersfield, California, earning his wings at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona in March 1945. He left the U.S. Air Force in 1946. The family moved to Tucson, Arizona in August 1956. He joined the Air National Guard in 1958 and retired in 1980.

In the photograph, Ron is standing at our front door on Thanksgiving Day 1970. We were on our way to take him to the Tucson Airport . He was enroute to Los Angeles, to spend the remaining holiday with his sister, Diana. Ron shipped out from San Francisco the next day for Vietnam.

I have been actively involved in the POW-MIA issue for the past thirty years, seeking answers to the fate of my son and our other unrepatriated prisoners of war/missing-in-action.
The United States Government has only provided conflicting reports concerning the incident of February 27, 1971.

I have said previously that Ron had nine lives. When he was six years old, I nearly lost him from a ruptured appendix. On Christmas Day at the age of eight, he fell from a tree house, dropping twenty feet. When he was ten years old, he was shot in the right eye with a BB gun, which left a permanet hole in his eye.
I thought, perhaps, this would certainly prevent him from serving in the military. It didn't.

I am not a person who knows much about metaphysics. However, on February 27, 1972, a Metaphysical Minister told me that Ron was a victim of amnesia. In time, the amnesia would clear and that Ron would try to find his way home. Over the years, I have attempted to obtain information regarding mental or amnesiac cases from the Vietnam Conflict, without success.

In 1971, I wrote a letter to the United States Army requesting specific information regarding the helicopter crash. In that letter I requested that the six men who had flown over the crash site contact me. I am still waiting to hear from these six men.

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POSTED ON 4.20.2001

I have Ronald's MIA bracelt

I just started wearing his MIA tag, it means a lot to me, if any one knows anything about him please email me so i can find out morre about him!!! my address ie [email protected]


thanks,

Eric
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POSTED ON 2.13.2001
POSTED BY: Beckie Tesar

MIA bracelet in museum in Glendale,AZ

The American Museum of Nursing
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POSTED ON 5.15.1999
POSTED BY: Donald Fineran

Ron I do Remember

I attended helicopter flight training with Ron and have photographs of him while we were in training. He was flying a Loach in the Lam Son action in Laos when he was shot down. His body was never found. I have read about his being shot down in a book about the Lam Son invasion. My brother-in-law, Don Latham of Alexander, Iowa (who also was in our flight class) visited Ron's parents in Arizona after returning from his tour in 1971. I remember Ron having a big mug on which he had printed "Born to Die". Ron I will remember you and your sacrifice, God rest your soul.

Donald Fineran
Cpt, US Army
C Co. 158th Aviation Battalion
101st Airborne Division (Airmobile)
1970
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