GORDON M GAYLORD
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HONORED ON PANEL 12W, LINE 100 OF THE WALL

GORDON MANSON GAYLORD

WALL NAME

GORDON M GAYLORD

PANEL / LINE

12W/100

DATE OF BIRTH

03/09/1933

CASUALTY PROVINCE

PLEIKU

DATE OF CASUALTY

04/06/1970

HOME OF RECORD

WOODSTOCK

COUNTY OF RECORD

McHenry County

STATE

IL

BRANCH OF SERVICE

AIR FORCE

RANK

TSGT

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR GORDON MANSON GAYLORD
POSTED ON 3.9.2017

Final Mission of TSGT Gordon M. Gaylord

On April 1, 1970, North Vietnamese army troops attacked the Dak Seang Special Forces Camp which lay northwest of Kon Tum in the Central Highlands of Vietnam, starting a siege that would last over five weeks. Despite indications that the enemy was building up strength in the area, no preparations were made. Only 12 hours before the attack was launched, USAF C-7 Caribou cargo aircraft were landing at Dak Seang to pick up ammunition for transport to another camp where the threat was thought to be greater. The NVA made their presence known at Dak Seang in the form of numerous anti-aircraft guns in the areas that were the most likely air resupply corridors. During the afternoon of April 1st, C-7 crews made the first drops into the camp. Enemy fire was light during the drop, but increased as the crews left the area. One airplane took two hits. The next morning, fighter suppression tactics were used and the C-7s were escorted by USAF A-1E Spads as they approached the drop zone. Despite these protective measures, the resupply aircraft continued to experience enemy pressure. The first C-7 over the camp reported ground fire while making a right hand turn after his drop. The second airplane, a C-7A (#61-2406) turned left, and was hit by heavy fire. It crashed five miles from the camp; there were no survivors. That afternoon an all-out effort was made to supply the camp. Eleven C-7s dropped to the camp using tactics such as descending turns to approach the camp at 20-second intervals. Three airplanes were hit by ground fire. On April 4th, fifteen sorties were flown in five or six ship cells, with elaborate protective measures, but still one aircraft was lost. With NVA troops only 30 feet from its outer walls of the camp, a USAF F-100D Super Sabre piloted by MAJ Jim Icenhour attempted to create a smokescreen by delivering white phosphorous pellets from an altitude of 200 feet at 500 knots so the Caribou could drop its supplies. Both Icenhour’s jet and the C-7B (#62-4180) he was escorting were hit by ground fire. The Caribou crashed two miles west of the airfield, killing its crew of three. Icenhour managed to recover his Super Sabre and landed at Phu Cat airbase. Tactics for the day of April 6th changed again. A-1E Spad escorts were placed under the control of each C-7 aircraft commander who could use them to escort or suppress as necessary during their drop. Forward air controllers (FACs) were used to prepare the approach corridor. The drop times were spaced at twenty minute intervals, and each C-7 was supposed to drop from a different heading. When the first three C-7s neared the target, however, the FAC on the scene directed that all three approach from the same heading. The last aircraft in this element, a C-7B (#63-9746), was hit and crashed after a short drop; again, there were no survivors. Though supplies were getting into the camp, some were lost while the C-7s were paying a heavy toll. In an attempt to reduce the losses, the C-7s turned to night drops under the light flares dropped by USAF AC-119 gunships who would also provide fire suppression. The new tactics worked as the C-7s took less hits and most of the bundles landed within the camp. By the beginning of May, enemy began to withdraw from the area and on May 9th the campaign had concluded. The lost Caribou air crews during the siege of Dak Seang included: (from C-7A #61-2406) aircraft commander 1LT Steve W. Train, co-pilot 1LT Charles E. Suprenant Jr., and flight engineer MSGT Dale E. Christensen; (from C-7B #62-4180) aircraft commander CAPT James A. Gray, co-pilot MAJ Frederick W. Dauten Jr., and engineer MSGT Russell L. Klein; and (from C-7B Caribou #63-9746) aircraft commander CAPT Julius P. Jaeger, co-pilot 1LT Theron C. Fehrenbach III, and flight engineer TSGT Gordon M. Gaylord. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org, wikipedia.org, archive.org, sammcgowan.com, and the book “F-100 Super Sabre Units of the Vietnam War” by Peter E. Davies and David Menard]
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POSTED ON 11.3.2014
POSTED BY: Samuel Kleinman

my friend

Gordon and I went to usaf flight engineer school together. We were stationed at Charleston AFB and flew C-121s. I knew his wife Mary and their two girls. I learned of his death much later.
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POSTED ON 12.18.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear TSGT Gordon Manson Gaylord, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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POSTED ON 10.5.2010
POSTED BY: Robert Sage

We Remember

Gordon is buried at McHenry County Mem Park, Woodstock, IL.
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POSTED ON 1.30.2006
POSTED BY: Bill Nelson

Never Forgotten

FOREVER REMEMBERED

"If you are able, save for them a place inside of you....and save one backward glance when you are leaving for the places they can no longer go.....Be not ashamed to say you loved them....
Take what they have left and what they have taught you with their dying and keep it with your own....And in that time when men decide and feel safe to call the war insane, take one moment to embrace those gentle heroes you left behind...."

Quote from a letter home by Maj. Michael Davis O'Donnell
KIA 24 March 1970. Distinguished Flying Cross: Shot down and Killed while attempting to rescue 8 fellow soldiers surrounded by attacking enemy forces.

We Nam Brothers pause to give a backward glance, and post this remembrance to you, one of the gentle heroes lost to the War in Vietnam:

Slip off that pack. Set it down by the crooked trail. Drop your steel pot alongside. Shed those magazine-ladened bandoliers away from your sweat-soaked shirt. Lay that silent weapon down and step out of the heat. Feel the soothing cool breeze right down to your soul ... and rest forever in the shade of our love, brother.

From your Nam-Band-Of-Brothers

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