MELESSO GARCIA
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HONORED ON PANEL 28E, LINE 24 OF THE WALL

MELESSO GARCIA

WALL NAME

MELESSO GARCIA

PANEL / LINE

28E/24

DATE OF BIRTH

10/18/1946

CASUALTY PROVINCE

BINH LONG

DATE OF CASUALTY

10/17/1967

HOME OF RECORD

WATSONVILLE

COUNTY OF RECORD

Santa Cruz County

STATE

CA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

PFC

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR MELESSO GARCIA
POSTED ON 8.17.2022
POSTED BY: John Fabris

honoring you...

Thank you for your service to our country so long ago sir. While all deaths in Vietnam are tragic that you died one day before your 21st birthday is especially so. May you rest in eternal peace.
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POSTED ON 10.18.2020
POSTED BY: Dennis Wriston

I'm proud of our Vietnam Veterans

Private First Class Melesso Garcia, Served with the 2nd Platoon, Company D, 2nd Battalion, 28th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, United States Army Vietnam.
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POSTED ON 11.8.2018
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear PFC Melesso Garcia,
Thank you for your service as an Infantryman. It has been too long, and it's about time for us all to acknowledge the sacrifices of those like you who answered our nation's call. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 11.18.2013
POSTED BY: Robert L Nelson

Remembering Our Own

Melesso Garcia
Private Melesso Garcia shared misgivings with his comrades
about going into combat on October 17, 1967.
Melesso Garcia listed Santa Cruz County as his residence;
however, the location of his birth, family members
and his life in the community have not been established. He
was born on October 18, 1946, and while some portion of
his education may have taken place in Watsonville, Watsonville
High School did not include him among their students
who died in Vietnam.
Garcia enlisted in the regular US Army in the fall of 1966
and received training at Fort Lewis, Washington. He was
assigned to Company D, 2nd Battalion (Black Lion Battalion)
of the 28th Infantry Regiment and on July 16, 1967,
began his Vietnam tour.
On October 17, 1967, Garcia’s company was in a jungle
area near Ong Thanh (about fifty miles from Saigon) when
they were ambushed by approximately 1200 Viet Cong
troops. The two US companies (A&D), totaling about
120 men, were pinned down as snipers opened fire from
all directions. Pulitzer Prize winning author David Maraniss,
in his book They Marched into Sunlight: War and Peace
Vietnam and America, October 1967, detailed the end of the
life of Private First Class Melesso Garcia.
To his left [SP4] Troyer saw Melesso Garcia behind a log,
gesturing. It seems that Garcia wanted to say something. He
turned on his side and pushed his body up with one hand
and at that moment was shot. A look came over his face that
Troyer had not seen before. For two days Garcia had been
haunted by premonitions that he should not be out there, and
now the realization of his foreboding registered on his face.
Melesso Garcia died one day short of his twenty-first
birthday. His remains were recovered and returned to
Houston, Texas, where they were buried in the Houston
National Cemetery.
Source
Remembering our Own
The Santa Cruz County Military Roll of Honor 1861-2010
By Robert L Nelson
The Museum of Art & History @ The McPherson Center
2010
Page 214
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POSTED ON 10.5.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter

Remembering An American Hero

Dear PFC Melesso Garcia, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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