HONORED ON PANEL 6W, LINE 46 OF THE WALL

WILLARD FREEMAN

WALL NAME

WILLARD FREEMAN

PANEL / LINE

6W/46

DATE OF BIRTH

09/10/1950

CASUALTY PROVINCE

THUA THIEN

DATE OF CASUALTY

11/08/1970

HOME OF RECORD

NEW YORK

COUNTY OF RECORD

New York City

STATE

NY

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

PFC

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR WILLARD FREEMAN
POSTED ON 9.10.2023
POSTED BY: Rita T

Happy Birthday!

Happy birthday--I hope that any friends and family of this soldier see this message and know that his country is proud of his service. Thank you.
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POSTED ON 8.4.2023

Ground Casualty

On May 16, 1971, a New York Times article described heroin use by American troops in Vietnam had reached epidemic proportions. The piece reported that 10 to 15 percent of lower-ranking enlisted men were heroin users, and military officials working in drug‐suppression estimated that as much as a quarter of all enlisted personnel, more than 60,000 men, were hooked. They added that some field surveys reported units with more than 50 percent of the men on heroin. In Vietnam, the drug was plentiful, cheap, and 95 percent pure. Its effects could casually be achieved through smoking or snorting, as compared to the U.S., where the drug was impure, only about five percent heroin, and had to be main-lined or injected into the bloodstream to achieve a comparable high. The habit, which cost $100 a day to maintain in the U.S., cost less than $5 a day in Vietnam. SP4 Willard Freeman was an infantryman serving with A Company, 3rd Battalion, 187th Infantry, 101st Airborne Division. At 7:15 AM on November 8, 1970, Freeman was at his base camp in Thua Thien Province, RVN, when he was found very ill with severe aspiration pneumonitis (inhalation of stomach contents). He was taken to the Battalion aid station, then transported to the 85th Evacuation Hospital at Phu Bai Combat Base in Hue at 9:40 AM. That afternoon, Freeman was placed on the critically ill list; he expired at 5:45 PM. Medical staff suspected an overdose of opium alkaloids, the latex (milky sap) of the opium poppy. When a casualty report was issued in January 1971, the cause of death was listed as “acute narcotism.” Freeman was 20 years old. At the time of his death, he had only been in Vietnam six weeks and was facing an additional three days to his term of enlisted service due to time lost for an unauthorized absence (AWOL). [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and “G.I. Heroin Addiction Epidemic in Vietnam.” New York Times (New York, NY), May 16, 1971]
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POSTED ON 8.2.2023

PFC Willard Freeman’s Military ID

Image courtesy of Redbird Research LLC, Saint Charles, MO.
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POSTED ON 8.1.2022
POSTED BY: John Fabris

honoring you...

Thank you for your service to our country so long ago sir. As long as you are remembered you will remain in our hearts forever…..
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POSTED ON 9.9.2021
POSTED BY: Donna Moore

Happy Heavenly Birthday

You will forever remain in our hearts and prayers
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