DAVID H FINGER
VIEW ALL PHOTOS (3)
HONORED ON PANEL 20W, LINE 101 OF THE WALL

DAVID HAROLD FINGER

WALL NAME

DAVID H FINGER

PANEL / LINE

20W/101

DATE OF BIRTH

01/08/1946

CASUALTY PROVINCE

THUA THIEN

DATE OF CASUALTY

08/06/1969

HOME OF RECORD

EDEN

COUNTY OF RECORD

Erie County

STATE

NY

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

CPL

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR DAVID HAROLD FINGER
POSTED ON 5.1.2016
POSTED BY: Loren Klene

Friends Forever

Fingers, I remember sitting on the bird, going out, looking at the countryside talking about how pretty it was if they hadn’t been shooting at us. I remember standing on the slicks going in, to unload. I still think about you and miss you.

Loren Klene
C-Company, 1st of the 506, 101st Airborne (1969)
read more read less
POSTED ON 10.16.2015

Boston Baseball

I lived very close by to the Finger family and was one of the Batboys of the Boston Baseball Town Team that David played on. David always treated me with respect and joked around with me and the other Batboys. When word came out regarding his casualty, the entire towns of Eden and Boston were devastated. His parents, Mr. and Mrs Harold Finger continued to attend the town team games since one of their other son's Tom was our shortstop. I remember having difficulty looking Tom in the eyes during my duties as a Batboy since he was very close to his brother. I served in the military from 1975-2007. Each ceremony that I attended on Memorial Day, Veterans Day, Marine Corps Birthday and many other formal events we traditionally reflect back on those that paid the ultimate sacrifice. For me, David Finger has been always the first on my mind. There are many replica Vietnam Veterans Walls and websites that honor those killed or missing and each time I look, he is the first one I honor. I just want the family to know, David is not forgotten!!!
Semper Fi!
James Zittel
CWO-4 USMC
read more read less
POSTED ON 3.2.2014
POSTED BY: Ken Andrews

Each Veteran correction

In my post I had a typo. It should read Hill 996, which had earlier in the war earned the title of "Hamburger Hill." Ironically another young man, who lived just 15 miles away from David would die on the same hill, 8 months later. His name was Dennis Heinz, who died while digging a fox hole early in Operation Ripcord. Dennis' commanding officer was Bob Kalsu, the only NFL player to die in Vietnam. For Dennis, just like David, baseball was his favorite sport, and he was part of the 506th Infantry, 101 ABN. I often wonder, if not been casualties of this war, would they have met on the baseball field in later years.
read more read less
POSTED ON 3.1.2014
POSTED BY: Ken Andrews

Each veteran is a precious piece in America's mosaic of Freedom.

David was my roommate for the 8 weeks of Basic Training at Ft. Dix. Our service numbers were consecutive. We had played baseball against each other. He was voted top trainee of our Company of 200 men. I think of him often, naming my oldest boy after him, posting his service number under the flag of the room that where I taught high school kids for 35 years. I created the message above with him in mind and it hangs in our American Legion Hall. I have asked his high school to put him in their Athletic Hall of Fame. And, as an old man of 68, I am constantly aware of the sacrifice this talented and patriotic young man made on Hill 966, although I did not know the details until this past summer.
read more read less
POSTED ON 11.14.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear CPL David Harold Finger, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
read more read less