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HONORED ON PANEL 10W, LINE 39 OF THE WALL

ROBERT K EVEREST III

WALL NAME

ROBERT K EVEREST III

PANEL / LINE

10W/39

DATE OF BIRTH

07/12/1948

DATE OF CASUALTY

05/14/1970

HOME OF RECORD

COLLEGE PARK

COUNTY OF RECORD

Fulton County

STATE

GA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

WO

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR ROBERT K EVEREST III
POSTED ON 4.19.2019

Final Mission of WO1 Robert K. Everest III

On May 14, 1970, a U.S. Army helicopter OH-6A (tail number 67-16199) from A Troop, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division, was conducting a reconnaissance mission within Cambodia when it was hit by enemy groundfire and crashed. Three crewmen were lost in the incident. They included pilot WO1 Robert K. Everest III, gunner SP4 Kenneth M. Walls Jr., and observer SP4 Lawrence R. Geiger. There are two accounts for this incident: First Account - “WO1 Everest was flying low bird on a recon north of Katum. We were looking for a Huey crew that had crashed or been shot down; we had located the aircraft but not the crew. Everest came under heavy fire from several RPD's (7.62mm light machine guns) and AK's using API (armor-piercing incendiary) rounds. Everest called taking fire and there was a small inflight-explosion. The aircraft then nosed into the bamboo and exploded on impact. I witnessed the whole thing and tried to evacuate the crew but took too many hits.” (Glen Senkowski); Second Account – The CO (Commanding Officer) sent him (Everest) out with Geiger, who was a top door gunner. The observer was a kid (Walls) who wanted to fly on his birthday. They were in the AO (Area of Operations) only twenty minutes when we got the call to scramble. On the way out we got the word that the pilot (Everest) had been hit doing a cloverleaf and was nose down in the ground. When we got there, Geiger was standing on the observer’s side of the aircraft trying to rescue the kid. The LOH (OH-6A) started to smoke, then it exploded. Geiger forgot the number one rule—that you throw out all the grenades and ammo as soon as you crash. That stuff just enhanced the explosion. There were twenty-five or thirty white phosphorous grenades on the LOH. (From Roger Paulmeno; Note: SP4 Walls died on his 19th birthday) [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and information provided by Glen Senkowski (October 1998) at vhpa.org; also, information provided by Roger Paulmeno in the book “Headhunters: Stories from the 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry, in Vietnam 1965-1971” by Matthew Brennan]
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POSTED ON 8.20.2018
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear WO Robert Everest,
Thank you for your service as an Utility/Observation Pilot with the 1st Cavalry. It has been too long, and it's about time for us all to acknowledge the sacrifices of those like you who answered our nation's call. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 8.28.2016
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear WO Robert K Everest III, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, Sir

Curt Carter
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POSTED ON 5.14.2014
POSTED BY: Jack Hugele

14 May 1970

I was the platooon leader of the Blue platoon and served with Slim Everest in Apache Troop 1/9. I didn't know WO Everest's first name. We all called him Slim. Slim and I shared a hooch together with 4 other guys in our base camp in Tay Ninh. On 1 May 1970 the U.S A took the fight into Cambodia and Apache Troop lost two helicopter crew in the first two weeks, Cpt. Rick Brewer and his crew on 02 May and WO Everest and his crew on 14 May. On that day, WO Everest was flying a LOH scout aircraft in support of our platoon on the ground. Our mission was to investigate activity in this area of Cambodia. Scouts in our support fly at tree top level guiding us to other areas and warning us of potential enemy threats. After about an hour into our mission, WO Everest started taking enemy fire approximately 200 yards away from our position. His aircraft took hits in his fuel tank and we could see the copter develope smoke and sink into the trees. It took at least 2 hours to fight our way thru the jungle and enemy fire to reach the aircraft. By the time we arrived the realized none of the crew survived the crash. Scout pilots had one of the most dangerous job in Viet Nam. I will always remember what happened 44 years ago today.
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POSTED ON 1.9.2012
POSTED BY: Robert Sage

We Remember

Robert is buried at Marietta National Cemetery.
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