WILLIAM D ELTRINGHAM
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HONORED ON PANEL 37E, LINE 54 OF THE WALL

WILLIAM DAVID ELTRINGHAM

WALL NAME

WILLIAM D ELTRINGHAM

PANEL / LINE

37E/54

DATE OF BIRTH

02/24/1945

CASUALTY PROVINCE

THUA THIEN

DATE OF CASUALTY

02/06/1968

HOME OF RECORD

BRANCHDALE

COUNTY OF RECORD

Schuylkill County

STATE

PA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SP5

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR WILLIAM DAVID ELTRINGHAM
POSTED ON 2.24.2020
POSTED BY: Jury Washington

Thank You For Your Valiant Service Soldier.

We can never truly repay the debt we owe our fallen heroes. Rest in peace
SP5. Eltringham, I salute your brave souls.
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POSTED ON 8.24.2019

Ground Casualty

SP5 William D. Eltringham served in a ground support role with D Company, 227th Assault Helicopter Battalion. D Company was a relatively small helicopter gunship unit which flew heavily armed A, B, & C model UH-1 helicopters. They provided armed aerial escort for troop transport helicopters during the insertion of infantry units along with aerial attack capabilities related to those actions. D Company gunships also flew escort for medical air evacuation from active engagement areas. And on occasion, the unit flew insertions of reconnaissance teams behind known enemy positions, including flights into extremely rugged, mountainous areas in countries adjoining Vietnam. On February 5, 1968, the 227th was in the process of relocating northward from a mid-country base at An Khe to a remote location named LZ Evans (later Camp Evans). LZ Evans was located about halfway between the ancient capital city of Hue and Quang Tri City, just below the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) between North and South Vietnam. "Eltringle," as Eltringham was known to other flight crew personnel, moved north with the unit in a truck convoy and spent the night at an Army facility adjacent to a Marine Corps installation at Red Beach Base Area near Da Nang in Quang Nam Province, RVN. There he was turned over to a 227th helicopter crew which would fly him the rest of the way to LZ Evans the following morning. That evening, the crew was advised to remain with their helicopter overnight due to a threat of an enemy assault and possible penetration of the base perimeter. Eltringham spent the night with crew. At 1:04 AM on February 6th, enemy mortar rounds began falling on the airfield. One hit a helicopter parked 100 away, the aircraft erupting in a huge, roaring fireball. The next round hit directly behind their helicopter, mortally wounding Eltringham. His body was pulled into the helicopter, and at dawn a jeep with a stretcher arrived to take him to Graves Registration. Later, it was learned that the round that took Eltrinham's life penetrated the PSP (steel landing mat), leaving a crater about 18" deep and a yard wide. Eltringham died after being struck by a large section of shrapnel from the round which landed only 8 to 10 feet away from where he lay on a cot. The helicopter he was sleeping by was unrepairable and never flew again. So riddled with shrapnel, it was not even allowed to be parts salvage. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and information provided by Warren Traweek (August 2013)]
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POSTED ON 8.5.2018
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

THANK YOU

Dear Sp5 William Eltringham,
Thank you for your service as an Airborne Qualified member of the 227th Assault Helicopter Battalion with the 1st Cavalry. We remember all you who gave their all. It has been too long, and it's about time for us all to acknowledge the sacrifices of those like you who answered our nation's call. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 11.20.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear SP5 William David Eltringham, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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POSTED ON 8.5.2013
POSTED BY: Warren Traweek

With W Eltringham 2-6-1968 at time of death

Was with William D. Eltringham at time of his death from incoming mortar fire; February 6, 1968.
Never wished to disrupt family healing processes nor cause further pain, so have not previously attempted to locate family members. But as I age, and after such a long time, I began to feel that perhaps someone might wish to know more about what happened that night,
If additional information is desired, please contact me at my e-mail address (below).
I sincerely apologize for this long delay, although in truth, I have not previously been ready to discuss these events in detail.
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