MICHAEL R EARL
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HONORED ON PANEL 15W, LINE 98 OF THE WALL

MICHAEL RANDALL EARL

WALL NAME

MICHAEL R EARL

PANEL / LINE

15W/98

DATE OF BIRTH

07/26/1944

CASUALTY PROVINCE

BINH DUONG

DATE OF CASUALTY

12/27/1969

HOME OF RECORD

LAS VEGAS

COUNTY OF RECORD

San Miguel County

STATE

NM

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

CWO

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR MICHAEL RANDALL EARL
POSTED ON 2.1.2014
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear CWO Michael Randall Earl, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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POSTED ON 3.15.2011
POSTED BY: Robert Sage

We Remember

Michael is buried at Santa Fe National Cemetery.
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POSTED ON 12.9.2010

Crash Information on U.S. Army helicopter AH-1G tail number 68-15065

The aircraft departed Sabre heliport, Di An, base camp at 1420 hours on a periodic inspection test flight. The test flight check sheet shows that the crew had completed the engine vibration test and had checked all of the items on the test flight check sheet except the diving maneuvers and the high speed autorotation. All items recorded on the check sheet were within prescribed tolerances except rotor rpm in autorotation, which was written as 'red lined'. At the time of the accident, the aircraft is believed to have been making a high speed dive initiated from a pedal turn which was prescribed in item #65 on the test flight sheet. The nearest witnesses to the AH-1G at the time of the accident were the crew members of a CH-47 of the 205th ash company. The crew of the CH -47 first observed the ah-1g at their one o'clock position. The aircraft was observed to enter a dive of about 60 deg nose low attitude and passed across to the front of and below the CH -47. The aircraft then pulled out of the dive at approximately 700 feet then started a steep climb. Climbing to 1500 feet and close to the CH -47 at its 11 o'clock position, the AH-1G then made a 180 deg right pedal turn at an estimated airspeed of 20 knots. With an attitude in excess of 90 deg bank, the aircraft went into a dive estimated by witnesses to have been 60 deg nose low attitude. The CH -47 aircraft commander and pilot lost visual contact with the ah-1g as it passed beneath the CH -47. The ah-1g was then sighted by the right door gunner on the CH -47. The ah-1g was observed to start a pull out and the door gunner shifted his attention for a few seconds. A witness on the ground at the northwest corner of di an base camp observed the ah-1g pull of the dive and started to climb then slowed its airspeed. It leveled momentarily, then assumed a slightly nose low attitude and made two spinning turns. Because of the distance from the aircraft, the witness on the ground did not see the aircraft strike the ground. When the right door gunner regained visual contact with the AH-1G, it was approximately 50 feet above the ground. It was making a tight turn to thr right. The main rotor assembly was spinning in the air approximately 100 meters to the east of the fuselage. With no detectable forward travel after impact, the aircraft came to rest on the left wind store, on the left side of the broken mast and on the upper left portion of the canopy. The right door gunner on the CH -47 estimated that the main rotor assembly remained airborne 5 to 10 seconds after the AH-1G crashed. The crash killed crewmen WO1 Michael R. Earl and SSG Richard P. Stotsbery. [Taken from vhpa.org]

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POSTED ON 4.6.2010

Photo

Photo
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POSTED ON 11.12.2003

From your son

I think about you often. You have not been forgotton.
Thank you
Michael
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