RICHARD T ARMSTRONG
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HONORED ON PANEL 8E, LINE 41 OF THE WALL

RICHARD TED ARMSTRONG

WALL NAME

RICHARD T ARMSTRONG

PANEL / LINE

8E/41

DATE OF BIRTH

05/26/1933

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG NGAI

DATE OF CASUALTY

06/12/1966

HOME OF RECORD

VALE

COUNTY OF RECORD

Lincoln County

STATE

NC

BRANCH OF SERVICE

MARINE CORPS

RANK

2LT

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR RICHARD TED ARMSTRONG
POSTED ON 10.18.2007
POSTED BY: Doyle Sanders

More Than Forty Years Have Gone By

I never met Lt. Armstrong, he was in the bush just before I arrived at HQ BTRY, 3rd Bn., 11th Marines. I was assigned to the Naval Gunfire Section and his death and capture of his radio operator, Cpl. Greg Harris, was my wake up call that Vietnam was a very dangerous place for healthy young men.

Lt. Armstrong was a "mustanger", he had been a Gunnery Sergeant (E-7). Just as I arrived in Vietnam he was assigned to support the 5th Vietnamese Marine Battalion with artillery support. Greg Harris his radio operator from the Comm Section, was due to leave country in a matter of days, but asked to be assigned to this operation instead a sending a newly arrived Marine. This was Milt Jenkins. The operation, QT-234, was supposed to be a simple blocking action, but the Viet Cong unit was larger than expected, I beleive it was a full battalion that struck the command unit and over-ran them. The American killed during this contact were Capt. Joseph Kennedy, the US Marine advisor and Lt. Armstrong. Corporal, now officially, Master Seregant Harris was last seen in the hands of the Viet Cong and is still listed as MIA by the Marine Corps, though the DoD has declared him dead. Another Marine officer, a Capt. McAffee, survived the assault on the command group, and subsequently was awarded the Navy Cross for his actions in rallying the command unit after the death of the senior advisor and several Vietnamese officers.

We hate it when we loose such men as Lt. Armstrong, and Capt, Kennedy and though death is final, thier spirit lives within us all who served in the Corps.

Rest peacefully Mr. Armstrong and may God be between you and harm in all the empty places you must walk.

For those who may not know, Mister is an old Navy tradition we inherited from the Brits, and Navy-Marine Corps officers, O-3 and below, can be addresed as Mister, instead of Lieutenant.
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POSTED ON 4.27.2006
POSTED BY: Bill Nelson

NEVER FORGOTTEN

FOREVER REMEMBERED

"If you are able, save for them a place inside of you....and save one backward glance when you are leaving for the places they can no longer go.....Be not ashamed to say you loved them....
Take what they have left and what they have taught you with their dying and keep it with your own....And in that time when men decide and feel safe to call the war insane, take one moment to embrace those gentle heroes you left behind...."

Quote from a letter home by Maj. Michael Davis O'Donnell
KIA 24 March 1970. Distinguished Flying Cross: Shot down and Killed while attempting to rescue 8 fellow soldiers surrounded by attacking enemy forces.

We Nam Brothers pause to give a backward glance, and post this remembrance to you, one of the gentle heroes lost to the War in Vietnam:

Slip off that pack. Set it down by the crooked trail. Drop your steel pot alongside. Shed those magazine-ladened bandoliers away from your sweat-soaked shirt. Lay that silent weapon down and step out of the heat. Feel the soothing cool breeze right down to your soul ... and rest forever in the shade of our love, brother.

From your Nam-Band-Of-Brothers
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POSTED ON 2.7.2006
POSTED BY: Arnold M. Huskins

Hometown news articles

The following was taken from the June 20, 1966 edition of the Lincoln Times News:

Two Lincoln Men Died in Viet Nam Last Week

A Marine officer and an Army warrent officer, both from Lincoln County, were killed in action last week in the war in South Viet Nam.

Marine Second Lt. Richard Ted Armstrong of Route One, Vale, was killed June 12 while he was serving as a forward observer for South Vietnamese troops...

Armstrong, 33, was killed in the vicinity of Quane-Ngai from what the Army(sic) said was multiple shrapnel wounds while he served as a forward observer for troops of the Republic of South Viet Nam.

Armstrong was serving with the Second Marine Division and was serving his second tour of duty in the country. He returned to the States in April of 1965 and went back to South Viet Nam early this year.

The Marine had just received a field commission from the rank of tech sergeant to second lieutenant.

Armstrong's wife, Mrs. Shirley Warlick Armstrong and son, Richard Ted Armstrong, Jr. live in Hickory. His brother, Richard L. Armstrong lives at 606 South Cedar in Lincolnton. His sister, Mrs. Charles Ruth, was with her husband in Japan at the time her brother was reported fatally wounded and flew home this past weekend.

Armstrong's mother, Mrs. Alene Armstrong, lives on Route One in Vale.

June 22, 1966 news article:

Funeral services for Lt. Richard Ted Armstrong who was killed in action in South Viet Nam June 12 will be held at 2 P.M. Thursday in the Trinity Lutheran Church in Vale with burial in Catawba Memorial Cemetery.

Marine Lt. Armstrong was serving as a forward observer for South Vietnamese troops at the time of his death.

Survivors inlcude the wife, Mrs. Shirley Warlick Armstrong of 233 14th Street SW, Hickory; son, Richard Ted Armstrong, 11 of the home; mother, Mrs. Alene Hoover Armstrong of Vale; two brothers, Richard Armstrong of Lincolnton and Joe Armstrong of Vale; sister, Mrs. Janice Ruth of Japan; maternal grandmother, Mrs. P.A. Hoover of Vale.
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POSTED ON 10.7.2003
POSTED BY: Rusty Collins

Thank you for your sacrifice

Your heroic deeds will not be forgotten, the Sacrifice you made to your country was a brave act and your country is greatful, you will not be forgotten, and thank you for your Sacrifice
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