JOHN R CUMMINS JR
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HONORED ON PANEL 10E, LINE 105 OF THE WALL

JOHN RUDOLPH CUMMINS JR

WALL NAME

JOHN R CUMMINS JR

PANEL / LINE

10E/105

DATE OF BIRTH

10/18/1946

CASUALTY PROVINCE

PR & MR UNKNOWN

DATE OF CASUALTY

09/17/1966

HOME OF RECORD

ROSWELL

COUNTY OF RECORD

Chaves County

STATE

NM

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

PFC

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR JOHN RUDOLPH CUMMINS JR
POSTED ON 9.16.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter

Remembering An American Hero

Dear PFC John Rudolph Cummins Jr, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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POSTED ON 1.13.2011
POSTED BY: Willie L. Cummins

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POSTED ON 1.13.2011
POSTED BY: Willie L. Cummins

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POSTED ON 1.13.2011
POSTED BY: Willie L. Cummins

The John Rudolph Cummins, JR Story

PFC John Rudolph Cummins, Jr. was born at St. Mary’s Hospital in Roswell, New Mexico on October 18, 1946. He was the second child and proud first son of Mrs. Willie Lavender Cummins of Braggs, Alabama and Mr. John Rudolph Cummins, Sr. of Lake Arthur, New Mexico.



Rudy Jr., as he was fondly called by his family, was a handsome, kind, and gentle young man. He was a cub scout and boy scout who was an avid reader of westerns, military history, and war stories. He loved to camp and fish and spend tie with his family and friends both in Alabama and New Mexico. He broke his arm two different times when he was growing up. Once when he was a little boy during the summertime in Braggs, Alabama when he fell off an auto car pit at his grandparents home. Again when he was thirteen and he fell off the back bumper of a moving car when his sisters boyfriend was pulling away. A hard lesson to learn.



Rudy attended Roswell, Gallup, Las Vegas, and Albuquerque schools and graduated from Roswell High School in May 1964. After graduation he became a plumbers apprentice and worked for Rhoades plumbing and heating in Roswell for one year before attending New Mexico State University in Las Cruces, New Mexico.



When the draft board pressured him he withdrew from NMSU after one semester and enlisted in the US Army to become a paratrooper. He received his basic training at Fort Bliss in El Paso, Texas and his parachute training at Fort Benning, Georgia. He was attached to the “Big Horse” First Cavalry101st Airborne Division. After coming home to Roswell, New Mexico for a 21 day leave to spend time with his family, friends, his beloved VW pickup trick, and black Hillman convertible he was deployed to Vietnam. He spent three weeks there having only enough time to write one letter describing the beauty of the rice fields and the sunset to his grandmother, Mrs. Nimmie Hazel Cummins of Roswell, New Mexico.



On September 16, 1966 he was on a search and seek mission for a downed plane near An Chi, Vietnam when he encountered a boobie trapped wing. God bless the fallen soldier. He was 19. Life truly is…”but a moment.”



He is sorely missed by his entire family in Alabama, Texas, and New Mexico; his parents, his brother Ernest Terrance Cummins of Roswell, New Mexico, and his sister Mettie Pauline Lavender Cummins of Bakersfield, California. We never forget, we love him so, and we always remember his beautiful smile.
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POSTED ON 8.17.2006
POSTED BY: Bill Nelson

NEVER FORGOTTEN


FOREVER REMEMBERED

"If you are able, save for them a place inside of you....and save one backward glance when you are leaving for the places they can no longer go.....Be not ashamed to say you loved them....
Take what they have left and what they have taught you with their dying and keep it with your own....And in that time when men decide and feel safe to call the war insane, take one moment to embrace those gentle heroes you left behind...."

Quote from a letter home by Maj. Michael Davis O'Donnell
KIA 24 March 1970. Distinguished Flying Cross: Shot down and Killed while attempting to rescue 8 fellow soldiers surrounded by attacking enemy forces.

We Nam Brothers pause to give a backward glance, and post this remembrance to you, one of the gentle heroes lost to the War in Vietnam:

Slip off that pack. Set it down by the crooked trail. Drop your steel pot alongside. Shed those magazine-ladened bandoliers away from your sweat-soaked shirt. Lay that silent weapon down and step out of the heat. Feel the soothing cool breeze right down to your soul ... and rest forever in the shade of our love, brother.

From your Nam-Band-Of-Brothers
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