CURTIS E CRAWFORD
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HONORED ON PANEL 15E, LINE 115 OF THE WALL

CURTIS EUGENE CRAWFORD

WALL NAME

CURTIS E CRAWFORD

PANEL / LINE

15E/115

DATE OF BIRTH

08/13/1947

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG TRI

DATE OF CASUALTY

02/28/1967

HOME OF RECORD

DUNKIRK

COUNTY OF RECORD

Chautauqua County

STATE

NY

BRANCH OF SERVICE

MARINE CORPS

RANK

CPL

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR CURTIS EUGENE CRAWFORD
POSTED ON 2.28.2014
POSTED BY: A Marine, Quang Tri, Vietnam

Semper Fi, Corporal.

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POSTED ON 12.1.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter ccarter02@earthlink.net

Remembering An American Hero

Dear CPL Curtis Eugene Crawford, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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POSTED ON 8.26.2012
POSTED BY: Robert Sage

We Remember

Curtis is buried at St Hepwigs Cemetery, Dunkirk,NY. SS PH-GS

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POSTED ON 12.7.2010

Never Forgotten

Never Forgotten
Rest in peace with the warriors. (Photo Credit: his daughter Laura)
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POSTED ON 3.29.2008
POSTED BY: Arnold M. Huskins

The Buffalo News article

Hero’s legacy returned
Mother finally reunited with certificates of Silver Star son who died in Vietnam

By Elmer Ploetz
29 March 2008

Shirley Popoff moved out of her apartment on Burch Avenue in West Seneca 35 years ago.

Behind her, in the attic, she left the papers that had notified her that her son, Curtis E. Crawford, had been posthumously awarded the Silver Star and Purple Heart for bravery in Vietnam.

On Friday afternoon, the certificates citing Curt Crawford’s heroics came home to his mother. Linda Jenkin Costanzo, a Buffalo teacher who is writing a book on Gold Star Mothers, presented her with the certificates.

“That’s part of my son’s history,” said Popoff.

The wall over her bed at Autumn View Manor in Hamburg has photos of her son, a case with his medals and photos of her other son, Michael, in his U.S. Navy uniform.

Popoff said she recently started thinking about the documentation that went with Curt Crawford’s medals, but couldn’t recall what had happened to the papers in the 41 years since her son died.

Crawford was a corporal in the Marines. He died on Feb. 28, 1967, near Cam Lo in the Quang Tri province of South Vietnam, one of 28 servicemen to die that day. He is one of two in the battle awarded the Silver Star.

“They were close to the enemy, and he saw a Marine pinned down,” said Popoff. “And he went out to help the Marine.”

He was 19 years old. But Popoff, who went on to become very involved as a volunteer at the Veterans Administration Medical Center in Buffalo, hadn’t seen the certificates that came with the medals, identifying her son and dating the medals, since 1973.

It turns out that when Popoff moved from her apartment to the Town of Boston, the young man who moved into the apartment eventually found the papers.

Popoff says, “I never kept things in the attic, but before he moved out he checked out the attic and he found these citations.”

Costanzo said she became aware of the papers thanks to an Internet posting by David Newcome, an Alden man.

He held onto them for 35 years, intending to return them to their rightful owner. But he didn’t know whom to give them to since Crawford’s mother had remarried and he didn’t know her new name.

Costanzo said she found a posting he had left on Crawford’s page on a Vietnam veterans memorial site, and she contacted him.

Popoff said she remembers her son — who would now be more than 60 years old — as an athletic boy who loved to dance, “an all-around fun guy.”

He also wasn’t much for writing, she said, which meant that she wasn’t too concerned when she didn’t receive letters every week. But she still worried, watching the news from Vietnam closely.

And she knew what had happened when her sister called her down from the upstairs apartment, she said, even before she saw the two Marine representatives standing there.

Costanzo said she’s been conducting interviews with Gold Star Mothers — the mothers of soldiers killed in action — and had come to know Popoff early in the process.

“Shirley was the first person I interviewed [for the book],” said Costanzo. “I have come to know her as a personal friend . . . Now these papers are finally getting back to his mother, who deserves them.”

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