ROBERT P COTE
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HONORED ON PANEL 10W, LINE 74 OF THE WALL

ROBERT PAUL COTE

WALL NAME

ROBERT P COTE

PANEL / LINE

10W/74

DATE OF BIRTH

08/03/1949

DATE OF CASUALTY

05/21/1970

HOME OF RECORD

TEHACHAPI

COUNTY OF RECORD

Kern County

STATE

CA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SGT

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR ROBERT PAUL COTE
POSTED ON 2.23.2011
POSTED BY: Robert Sage

We Remember

Robert is buried at Tehachapi Public Cemetery, Tehachapi, Kern County,CA. BSM AM
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POSTED ON 8.30.2004
POSTED BY: Chris Spencer

NATIVE AMERICAN PRAYER

It is said a man hasn't died as long as he is remembered. This prayer is a way for families, friends and fellow veterans to remember our fallen brothers and sisters. Do not stand at my grave and weep I am not there, I do not sleep. I am a thousand winds that blow, I am the diamond glints on snow. I am the sunlight on ripened grain, I am the gentle autumn rain. When you awaken in the morning hush, I am the swift, uplifting rush of quiet birds in circled flight, I am the stars that shine at night. Do not stand at my grave and cry, I am not there, I did not die
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POSTED ON 11.17.2002
POSTED BY: Howard Hill

My friend

We grew up together, played ball together, had fun together, went to school together, but then Tehachapi was a small town so everybody knew each other. What would life have been like if you had come home? I visited the traveling wall today, although I knew it would be emotional, I was not prepared for the amount of feelings that were conveyed from the wall to each of the visitors. You are in a better place now, so sad to see that you are gone.
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POSTED ON 12.27.1998
POSTED BY: Robert Kon

Another Face of War

Bob was a member of Bravo, 1/7th Cavalry, First Air Cav. Division and while I did not really know him, I was there when he died and can relate what memory will allow. He belonged to the HQ group of the company as an RTO and this particular day was for resupply so we had formed up into a large perimeter in an area that was almost suitable for a chopper to land except for one large tree. Much too large for chopping, it had to be blown down using several pounds of C4 explosive. I wish I knew all of the details as to size of tree and size of our perimeter, but I am sure the tree could have covered the diameter of our position easily, so it was important that it fall away from the landing site for our safety as well as chopper access to the landing zone. We had to trust the people doing the 'engineering' on that tree and they apparently did keep it substantially out of the LZ. When the loud warning of "Fire in the hole" was given the third time, detonation occurred and the tree crashed to the ground while I lay prone facing away from it on the opposite side of our perimeter. The tree fell on a tangent to the perimeter rather than fully away and as I heard it shortly later, Bob looked out from behind the tree that was providing him cover (with others from the command group?) and was struck in the head by a heavy branch of the falling tree. The statistics say that about 10,000 of the 58,000 plus who died in the vietnam war died from non-hostile causes; a harsh statistic which seems to carry unique tragic properties.
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