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CHARLES RICHARD ANDERSON


is honored on Panel 4W, Line 18 of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

Leave a Remembrance

REMEMBRANCES

  • Final Mission of 1LT Charles R. Anderson

    Posted on 1/5/18 - by wkillian@smjuhsd.org
    On March 3, 1971, during Operation Lam Son 719, several American aviation units combat assaulted a battalion of 1st Infantry ARVN troops into a landing zone (LZ) in Laos called Lolo. Their mission was to establish a fire-support base. During the lift, five U.S. helicopters were shot down. The fifth aircraft to be lost was a UH-1 Huey from B Company, 158th Assault Helicopter Battalion, the “Lancers.” During the approach to the LZ, the Lancer crew chief, SP4 Paul A. Sgambati, received a serious head wound after being hit by an AK-47 round. He was unconscious when the helicopter went down and was evacuated that afternoon to the Evacuation Hospital in Quang Tri, but died soon thereafter. The Huey crashed after landing and discharging its ARVN troops. As the helicopter began to lift out of the LZ, an explosion occurred and it came crashing back down to the ground. Several sources claim a rocket-propelled grenade hit the helicopter. However, the enemy had bracketed the LZ, and 82mm mortar rounds were raining on the area. It also may be the reason it was destroyed by fire quicker than the other downed aircraft in the LZ. After the explosion occurred, the helicopter crashed back to earth, landing in some loose dirt where the front of the Huey dug in. As the crew egressed the aircraft, co-pilot 1LT Charles R. Anderson didn't take this into consideration. When he got out of the ship and started running towards a trench, he was hit in the head by the still spinning main rotor made lower by the soft earth. He was killed instantly. The ARVN covered his body with ponchos and had great difficulty moving him because of his size. A U.S. air crew was sent back into Lolo to get Anderson's body. The ARVN couldn't lift him, so two American crewmen went and helped get him into the ship. They took him to the Khe Sahn surgical pad. A sergeant came out with a litter to meet the aircraft. He motioned for two medical orderlies to come help him, and they took Anderson over to the side. He worked with the ponchos still covering Anderson for a few seconds, then stood up and slowly saluted the dead officer. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org, 174ahc.org, and thelancers.org]
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  • Remembered

    Posted on 9/2/16 - by Lucy Conte Micik bennysgift@gmail.com
    DEAR LIEUTENANT ANDERSON,
    THANKS FOR BEING A ROTARY WING AVIATION UNIT COMMANDER. ON THIS HOLIDAY WEEKEND, IT IS IMPORTANT TO REMEMBER THOSE OF YOU WHO MAKE IT POSSIBLE FOR US TO CELEBRATE. REST IN PEACE
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  • I'm proud of our Vietnam Veterans

    Posted on 8/2/16 - by Dennis Wriston
    First Lieutenant Charles Richard Anderson, Served with Company B, 158th Helicopter Assault Battalion, 101st Aviation Group, 101st Airborne Division.
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  • Remembering An American Hero

    Posted on 2/21/14 - by Curt Carter ccarter02@earthlink.net
    Dear 1LT Charles Richard Anderson, sir

    As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

    May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

    With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

    Curt Carter
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  • Best brother-in-law..still loved and missed

    Posted on 5/9/12 - by Eileen Grandell DeGregoriis eileendeg@aol.com
    Charles, we all still love and miss you so much. Your son, Chuck, is a wonderful man. You would be proud. You have two grandsons..the elder is left handed and a natural athlete just like you! The younger is so smart. You are always a part of us. You are always remembered.
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The Wall of Faces

Brought to you by the organization that built The Wall, the Vietnam Veterans Virtual Memorial Wall is dedicated to honoring, remembering and sharing the legacies of all those who died in the Vietnam War. Here you can go beyond the names on The Wall to see the faces, share the stories and read the remembrances posted by friends, neighbors, classmates and family members.

All of these photos will be showcased in The Education Center at The Wall on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. To learn more about the effort to collect these photos and ensure their faces will never be forgotten, visit www.buildthecenter.org.