The Wall of Faces

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ALVIN PETER CHRISTENSEN


is honored on Panel 56W, Line 18 of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

Leave a Remembrance

REMEMBRANCES

  • THANK YOU

    Posted on 11/18/17 - by LUCY CONTE MICIK bennysgift@gmail.com
    Dear PFC Alvin Christensen,
    Thank you for your service as an Infantryman. Happy Thanksgiving. This is the month that we remember all those who have passed-on. We remember you. It is so important for us all to acknowledge the sacrifices of those like you who answered our nation's call. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
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  • Remembering An American Hero

    Posted on 6/19/15 - by Curt Carter ccarter02@earthlink.net
    Dear PFC Alvin Peter Christensen, sir

    As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

    May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

    With respect, Sir

    Curt Carter
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  • Never Forgotten

    Posted on 3/19/11
    Alvin Peter Christensen was born May 10, 1945, to Audley and Clara (Delaney) Christensen on a farm in Spring Valley Township, South Dakota. His siblings are Elizabeth, JoAnn, and Joy. Until fifth grade, Alvin went to country school; when the family moved, he started school in Viborg, South Dakota. He was in Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts. Prior to starting his own carpentry business, Alvin worked on various farms. Alvin Christensen was drafted into the army on November 21, 1967, and was trained at Fort Lewis, Washington. Alvin was a Private First Class, Company C, 1st Battalion, 26th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. He was sent overseas on May 4, 1968, after spending a couple weeks home with his family on leave. Private First Class Alvin Peter Christensen died in Vietnam on June 18, 1968, “due to gunshot wounds received during hostile ground action on the previous day.” Alvin was 23 when he died and had been in Vietnam just over a month. His body was returned to the United States and he was buried with military honors in the Spring Valley Baptist Cemetery, on July 1, 1968. He received a Bronze Star with a V and first Oak Leaf Cluster, Purple Heart, Army Commendation medal, Good Conduct medal, National Defense Service medal, Vietnam Service medal, Vietnam Campaign ribbon, Combat Infantry badge, Sharpshooter’s badge with rifle bar and Marksman’s badge with machine gun bar. At the time of his death he was survived by his parents, Audley and Clara Christensen, and his sisters, Elizabeth, JoAnn, and Joy. Rest in peace with the warriors.
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  • We Remember

    Posted on 11/28/10 - by Robert Sage rsage@austin.rr.com
    Alvin is buried at Spring Valley Cemetery, Viborg,SD. BSM-OLC ARCOM PH
  • Remembering

    Posted on 12/27/01 - by Larry GOETTE
    Many times I have thought about you and our last ride in your car. Crazy times to say the least. I sure wished I had known you were in-country while I was there. I would have done everything to get to see you. I miss not hearing from Joy and Duane. You will always be in my memories and a part of my life.
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The Wall of Faces

Brought to you by the organization that built The Wall, the Vietnam Veterans Virtual Memorial Wall is dedicated to honoring, remembering and sharing the legacies of all those who died in the Vietnam War. Here you can go beyond the names on The Wall to see the faces, share the stories and read the remembrances posted by friends, neighbors, classmates and family members.

All of these photos will be showcased in The Education Center at The Wall on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. To learn more about the effort to collect these photos and ensure their faces will never be forgotten, visit www.buildthecenter.org.