The Wall of Faces

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GREGORY FRANCIS AMBROSE


is honored on Panel 44E, Line 56 of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

Leave a Remembrance

REMEMBRANCES

  • Remembered

    Posted on 8/30/16 - by Lucy Conte Micik bennysgift@gmail.com
    DEAR PFC AMBROSE,
    THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE AS AN ARMY GRUNT.
    REST IN PEACE.
    MORE
  • I'm proud of our Vietnam Veterans

    Posted on 6/25/16 - by Dennis Wriston
    Private First Class Gregory Francis Ambrose, Served with Company B, 1st Battalion, 18th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division.
  • Remembering An American Hero

    Posted on 3/24/14 - by Curt Carter ccarter02@earthlink.net
    Dear PFC Gregory Francis Ambrose, sir

    As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

    May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

    With respect, Sir

    Curt Carter
    MORE
  • My dad was killed in the same battle on the same day...

    Posted on 3/16/14 - by Larry Taggart
    I don't know how well they knew each other but my dad, PFC Larry Joel Taggart (B CO, 1st BN, 18th infantry, 1st INF DIV), was killed in action on 03/15/1968 in Gia Dihn, Vietnam. Thank you for your service and I am sorry for your loss.
    MORE
  • Greg, your sacrifice will never be forgotten.

    Posted on 7/1/11 - by Chris Taylor Christopher.Taylor@atf.gov
    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Executive Order 11046, 24 August 1962, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Bronze Star Medal with Combat 'V' to Private First Class Gregory Francis Ambrose (ASN: US-52747088), United States Army, for heroism in connection with military operations against a hostile force. On 15 March 1968, Private First Class Ambrose was serving as a rifleman with his company during a search and destroy operation south of Thu Duc. He was with the lead element of the friendly force when they made contact with a reinforced Viet Cong platoon utilizing heavy machine gun, claymore mine and small arms fire. In the initial burst of fire, Private First Class Ambrose dashed to the point of heaviest contact where he provided highly suppressive fire to cover the deployment of the rest of his platoon. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he remained exposed to the heavy enemy fire until he was certain that all his comrades had safely reached cover. It was only then that Private First Class Ambrose himself sought cover. He began to withdraw from his forward position continuing his accurate fire upon the well-entrenched insurgents. It was at this time that he was mortally wounded. The dauntless courage, determined efforts, and deep concern for the welfare of his fellow soldiers exhibited by Private First Class Ambrose undoubtedly saved several friendly lives and contributed significantly to the ultimate defeat of a large Viet Cong force. Private First Class Ambrose's outstanding display of aggressiveness, devotion to duty, and personal bravery is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division and the United States Army.
    MORE
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The Wall of Faces

Brought to you by the organization that built The Wall, the Vietnam Veterans Virtual Memorial Wall is dedicated to honoring, remembering and sharing the legacies of all those who died in the Vietnam War. Here you can go beyond the names on The Wall to see the faces, share the stories and read the remembrances posted by friends, neighbors, classmates and family members.

All of these photos will be showcased in The Education Center at The Wall on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. To learn more about the effort to collect these photos and ensure their faces will never be forgotten, visit www.buildthecenter.org.