The Wall of Faces

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EDWARD DEAN BROWN JR


is honored on Panel 2E, Line 44 of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

Leave a Remembrance

REMEMBRANCES

  • Thank You

    Posted on 7/17/17 - by Lucy Conte Micik bennysgift@gmail.com
    Dear Lt JG Edward Brown,
    Thank you for your service as an Unrestricted Line Officer (Pilot) from the U. S. S. BON HOMME RICHARD. I read that you are still MIA.
    Please come home.
    It is another summer, as time continues to pass since Vietnam. It is important for us all to acknowledge the sacrifices of those like you who answered our nation's call. Please watch over America, it stills needs your courage and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels
    MORE
  • Final Mission of LT Edward D. Brown

    Posted on 7/27/14 - by wkillian@smjuhsd.org
    The Vought F-8 "Crusader" saw action early in U.S. involvement in Southeast Asia. Its fighter models participated both in the first Gulf of Tonkin reprisal in August 1964 and in the myriad attacks against North Vietnam during Operation Rolling Thunder. The Crusader was used exclusively by the Navy and Marine air wings and represented half or more of the carrier fighters in the Gulf of Tonkin during the first four years of the war. The aircraft was credited with nearly 53% of MiG kills in Vietnam. Between 1964 to 1972, eighty-three Crusaders were either lost or destroyed by enemy fire. Another 109 required major rebuilding. 145 Crusader pilots were recovered; 57 were not. Twenty of these pilots were captured andreleased. The other 43 remained missing at the end of the war. LT Edward D. Brown was a pilot assigned to Fighter Squadron 191 onboard the aircraft carrier USS Bon Homme Richard (CVA-31). On July 29, 1965 he launched in his F-8E Crusader aircraft on a strike mission over South Vietnam. The mission would take him into the Delta region of South Vietnam, in Vinh Binh Province near the city of Phu Vinh. On a strafing pass, Brown's aircraft was seen to impact the ground. No evidence of ejection attempt was observed, and it was felt that if Brown went down with his plane, no remains were recoverable. Hostile fire was observed in the vicinity. Brown was classified Killed in Action/Body Not Recovered. [Narrative taken from pownetwork.org; image from wikipedia.org]
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  • Remembering An American Hero

    Posted on 12/2/13 - by Curt Carter ccarter02@earthlink.net
    Dear LTJG Edward Dean Brown Jr, sir

    As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

    May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

    With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

    Curt Carter
    MORE
  • Remembrance

    Posted on 3/29/12 - by Jim Reece
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  • On Silver Wings

    Posted on 7/29/07 - by Dave Avery averyds@carrollsweb.com
    On Silver Wings
    They Flew The Skies
    These Brave Young Men
    Who Fought And Died
    When Duty Called
    They Went So Brave
    Now Families Mourn
    Beside Their Grave
    Who Can Forget
    What Courage They Had
    Some Have,Some Did
    And That's So Sad
    MORE
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The Wall of Faces

Brought to you by the organization that built The Wall, the Vietnam Veterans Virtual Memorial Wall is dedicated to honoring, remembering and sharing the legacies of all those who died in the Vietnam War. Here you can go beyond the names on The Wall to see the faces, share the stories and read the remembrances posted by friends, neighbors, classmates and family members.

All of these photos will be showcased in The Education Center at The Wall on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. To learn more about the effort to collect these photos and ensure their faces will never be forgotten, visit www.buildthecenter.org.