The Wall of Faces

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ROBERT RAYMOND BRETT


is honored on Panel 40E, Line 58 of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

Leave a Remembrance

REMEMBRANCES

  • High School

    Posted on 5/29/18 - by Thomas J. Valtman
    Father Brett; I remember your smiling face throughout my 4 years at Chanel High School in Bedford, Ohio. In our sophomore year you became our teacher for Latin II; you found out that our class didn't get a very good foundation in Latin I the previous year, and you worked hard with us all to get us through 2 years of Latin in one year. I was terribly saddened when I found out that you had been killed in Quang Tri province in 1968 while you were performing your Catholic Chaplain duties for so many who were wounded without regard for your own safety. May you be in heaven with your family and many others of us who graduated in 1965 and are now deceased, also. God Bless, Father Brett.
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  • THANKS

    Posted on 6/29/17 - by Lucy Conte Micik bennysgift@gmail.com
    Dear Lt. (Father) Brett,
    Thank you for being a Navy Staff Corps Chaplin with the 3rd Marine Division. Thank you also for the comfort you gave the Marines in need. Semper Fi. As a Catholic, I appreciate that you were there for him. It was Christ-like. Independence Day is approaching, and it is important for us all to acknowledge the sacrifices of those like you who answered our nation's call. Please watch over America, it stills needs your courage and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
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  • Final Mission of LT Robert R. Brett

    Posted on 2/13/16 - by wkillian@smjuhsd.org
    Father Robert R. Brett, S.M., a Catholic chaplain and Navy Lieutenant serving in Vietnam, gave his life for God and country on February 26, 1968, at age 33. He was killed in action by enemy mortar fire at the Khe Sanh Combat Base while waiting to celebrate Mass for U.S. Marines. Assigned with the 2nd Battalion, 26th Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division, Father Brett had been in Vietnam since late the previous September. Especially during the few days before his death, he traveled frequently between war-torn outposts. In addition to providing religious services and rites for Marines of his own faith, Lieutenant Brett provided services for personnel of other denominations and made himself available to all who sought his assistance rendering spiritual aid and encouraging the men by his presence," read Navy reports. Due to security, space and staff restrictions, it was not possible for military personnel to gather in a large group, so Father Brett would go wherever he was needed. "During this time he celebrated masses almost continuously up to 10 per day under these circumstances," continued the correspondence. He was mortally wounded while in a bunker awaiting transportation to another area. [Taken from catholicherald.com]
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  • Remembering An American Hero

    Posted on 2/1/14 - by Curt Carter ccarter02@earthlink.net
    Dear LT Robert Raymond Brett, sir

    As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

    May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

    With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

    Curt Carter
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  • Priest and Teacher

    Posted on 7/27/13 - by John G. Woynsky, LTC, USA Ret.
    Robert Brett was a Marist Priest and Brother who taught at Chanel High School, Bedford Ohio from about 1962 to at least 1965. He was a good man and a great teacher. I went to school at Chanel graduating in 1966.
    MORE
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The Wall of Faces

Brought to you by the organization that built The Wall, the Vietnam Veterans Virtual Memorial Wall is dedicated to honoring, remembering and sharing the legacies of all those who died in the Vietnam War. Here you can go beyond the names on The Wall to see the faces, share the stories and read the remembrances posted by friends, neighbors, classmates and family members.

All of these photos will be showcased in The Education Center at The Wall on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. To learn more about the effort to collect these photos and ensure their faces will never be forgotten, visit www.buildthecenter.org.