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RAYMOND MASSIE THOMPSON

  • Wall Name:RAYMOND M THOMPSON
  • Date of Birth:2/12/1944
  • Date of Casualty:8/25/1966
  • Home of Record:MONROE
  • County of Record:AMHERST COUNTY
  • State:VA
  • Branch of Service:ARMY
  • Rank:SP4
  • Panel/Line:10E, 45
  • Casualty Province:PR & MR UNKNOWN

RONALD LEE WATSON

  • Wall Name:RONALD L WATSON
  • Date of Birth:12/29/1943
  • Date of Casualty:8/25/1966
  • Home of Record:EL RENO
  • County of Record:CANADIAN COUNTY
  • State:OK
  • Branch of Service:ARMY
  • Rank:SP4
  • Panel/Line:10E, 45
  • Casualty Province:PR & MR UNKNOWN

J C WALKER JR


is honored on Panel 10E, Line 42 of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

Leave a Remembrance

REMEMBRANCES

  • One Who Gave All

    Posted on 4/24/16 - by Bobbie Walker Wynn bjwynn@windstream.net
    He finished basic training, and then AIT
    Then said, "I know exactly what's waiting for me"
    Though we all hoped he was wrong, turns out he was right
    And in no time it seemed, he was off on his flight
    His destination, Vietnam, a most dreaded place
    But he accepted this challenge with dignity and grace
    Many tears were shed by both family and friends
    And our hopes and our prayers were that the war would soon end
    From the letters he wrote home, and from the six o'clock news
    Left no doubt that he was paying his dues
    He often spoke of buddies who were wounded or killed
    And how bitterness and hatred, his heart soon was filled
    The intense heat and humidity made his body pale and thin
    And he wondered to himself, would Vietnam be his end
    In July of sixty-six he turned twenty-one
    Wading booby trapped rice paddies in the hot blazing sun
    The watchdog of his sanity was his will to stay alive
    Applying all he had learned just to survive
    Often the fire fights seemed impossible to win
    And often he feared he would not see home again
    The harsh reality of war soon caught up with this young man
    At the Battle of Bong Trang, while surrounded and out-manned
    Fatally wounded in the prime of his life
    No more would he suffer or endure mortal strife
    The life light of this brave hero slowly flickered, then died
    And his soul rose to Heaven, with his savior to abide.
    MORE
  • Remembering An American Hero

    Posted on 8/25/13 - by Curt Carter
    Dear PFC J C Walker Jr, sir

    As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

    May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

    With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

    Curt Carter
    MORE
  • Rembering Jakey after 45 years

    Posted on 9/29/11 - by Bobbie Walker Wynn bjwynn@windstream.net
    Pfc J. C. 'Jakey' Walker, Jr., was a member of Company C, 1st Bn, 2nd Inf. Reg.['Black Scarves'] 1st Inf. Div. He had been in Vietnam only 5 months and had celebrated his 21st birthday on 22 July 1966. One month and three days later his young life came to an abrupt end on 25 August 1966 during the battle of Bong Trang, thus ending the aspirations, hopes and dreams of one whose life had barely begun. Those who knew and loved Jakey cherish the many fond memories he left behind.
    MORE
  • A Hero from the Sabine River Bottom

    Posted on 9/4/11 - by Stephen Cox scox@coxcontractors.com
    As kids growing up in the Sabine River bottom in the 1960s, it was quite an adventure. We lived with Palo Gaucho Creek 200 yards out our front door. We lived in an old wood frame house that had 2 bedrooms in the main living quarters, a breezeway that connected to a part of the house that had four plain bedrooms, no toilet and only electricity and heat. My family always gave people a place to sleep and eat. J. C Walker (we called him Jakey) would come to our home and stay sometimes. He and my dad, Chester D. Cox Sr. would go in the river bottom and hunt or work our hogs, cattle and goats. Jakey had a car and lots of times he would let my brother (Chester D. Cox, Jr.) and I go with him to Hemphill or over into Louisiana. The most memorable thing was one day Jakey, Chester Jr. and I were in Jakey's car going through the back roads to the 'Buffalo Hole' on the Sabine River. We met a car on this narrow dirt road and the other car took extreme evasive action not to hit us head-on. Jakey swerved right and did not make contact with the other vehicle, but the other vehicle hit the embankment on the other side. We stopped and the other person was not hurt. His car ws lodged against the embankment. Jackey backed his car up to this guy's car and gave him a tug with a chain and we continued onto the Buffalo Hole to throw cans and bottles off this huge bluff into the sabine river to take target practice with 22s. My family was extrememly close to Jakey and we all fel extreme loss at his passing (sacrifice). I was only 11 or 12 year old at the time but I do remember him well and he is one of my heros. I also rmember his funeral and his family's loss also. About five years ago, I was messing around with our computer (which I know very little about) and ran accross some information on Jakey about his service to this country. I was so delighted to read about him after I had become grown and could better appreciate this person who had made such an impression on my life as a young child. His is a hero in mmy eyes.
    MORE
  • A True Hero

    Posted on 9/1/11 - by Trina Jerge tjerge@yahoo.com
    My Uncle, J C Walker, Jr. 'Jakey' was killed in Vietnam when I was only 7 years old. I have heard my entire life that he died a hero....About 15 years ago a man walked in to the local bank where I worked, stopped at my desk and said, 'I'm looking for someone related to J C Walker, Jr.' I told him 'that would be me'. I could see his relief as he said, 'Finally, I've been all over this town'. He explained that he was my Uncle Jakey's platoon Sgt. at Fort Polk, but when they got to Vietnam they were separated. He kept up with Uncle Jakey though, and heard numerous tales of his bravery and how many men's lives he saved. He said the last time that he saw him they passed on the road, Uncle Jakey's company was headed
    South and his company was headed North. Uncle Jakey's company were wearing black flags on their back. They were headed into the battle that my Uncle was killed in, Bong Trang. Later the man heard that Uncle Jakey had been running out and rescuing the wounded when he was shot three times. He told me 'I'm from Illinois Mam and I've told my wife for years that one day we are going to Texas on vacation, and I'm going to look Jakey's family up and make sure they know he died a hero.' I told him that I'd been told that he died saving another man's life, and he said, 'No Mam, that wasn't the only time he did that; he saved lots of men's lives'. My grandfather was still alive at the time and I gave him directions to my grandfathers house, to the cemetary where he is buried, and to the Negreet High School, where they have a monument at their flag pole dedicating the school to him. He went to visit my grandfather, then went to the cemetary, and the school. It meant so very much to our family for this man to do this for Uncle Jakey and for us.




    MORE
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The Wall of Faces

Brought to you by the organization that built The Wall, the Vietnam Veterans Virtual Memorial Wall is dedicated to honoring, remembering and sharing the legacies of all those who died in the Vietnam War. Here you can go beyond the names on The Wall to see the faces, share the stories and read the remembrances posted by friends, neighbors, classmates and family members.

All of these photos will be showcased in The Education Center at The Wall on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. To learn more about the effort to collect these photos and ensure their faces will never be forgotten, visit www.buildthecenter.org.