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LARRY DELARNARD AIKEN


is honored on Panel 20W, Line 42 of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

Leave a Remembrance

REMEMBRANCES

  • Remembered

    Posted on 8/10/16 - by Lucy Conte Micik
    DEAR SPEC 4 AIKEN,
    THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE AS A GRUNT. JAMAICA, QUEENS WAS ACROSS THE STREET FROM WHERE I GREW UP. YOU WERE A NEIGHBOR.
    TO ESCAPE FROM BEING A POW IS AMAZING.
    MAY GOD BLESS YOU.
    REST IN PEACE.
    MORE
  • IN REMEMBRANCE OF THIS FINE YOUNG UNITED STATES ARMY SOLDIER WHOSE NAME SHALL LIVE FOREVER MORE

    Posted on 1/20/16 - by CLAY MARSTON CLAYMARSTON@HOTMAIL.COM

    SPECIALIST 4

    LARRY DELARNARD AIKEN

    served with

    Company C

    3rd Battalion

    21st Infantry Regiment

    " DUTY "

    196th Infantry Brigade

    " CHARGERS "

    and became a
    posthumous recipient
    of the following
    military decorations
    and service medals

    BRONZE STAR MEDAL

    PURPLE HEART

    PRISONER OF WAR MEDAL

    ARMY GOOD CONDUCT MEDAL

    NATIONAL DEFENSE SERVICE MEDAL

    VIETNAM SERVICE MEDAL

    REPUBLIC OF SOUTH VIETNAM CAMPAIGN SERVICE MEDAL

    and was entitled to wear the

    COMBAT INFANTRYMAN BADGE

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    LARRY DELARNARD AIKEN enlisted in the U.S. Army on 12 June 12, 1968, and after completing basic training at Fort Jackson, South Carolina, was trained as an infantryman.

    SP4 Aiken deployed to Southeast Asia in November 1968, and served with Company C, 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment of the 196th Infantry Brigade in South Vietnam from November 1968 until he was captured and taken as a Prisoner of War on 13 May 1969.

    After spending 59 days in captivity, he was rescued in a raid by U.S. Forces on 10 July 1969, but then succumbed to his injuries on 25 July 1969.

    He was buried at the Long Island National Cemtery in Farmingdale, New York.



    YOU ARE NOT FORGOTTEN

    NOR SHALL YOU EVER BE



    R E M E M B R A N C E


    MORE
  • Final Mission of SP4 Larry D. Aiken

    Posted on 12/8/15 - by wkillian@smjuhsd.org
    Of 45 raids mounted by U.S. forces to rescue American prisoners in Vietnam between 1966 and 1970, only one succeeded. Army SP4 Larry D. Aiken was rescued on July 10, 1969, from a Viet Cong POW camp, but he died in an American hospital 15 days later of wounds inflicted by his captors just before his rescue. The raid, apparently, had been compromised at the last minute. After Aiken's 1969 rescue, efforts to find POW camps and free prisoners in South Vietnam and Cambodia intensified. In 1970 alone, 24 separate rescue operations were conducted in the south. They failed to unearth even the remains of a single U.S. prisoner. The rescue missions continued even after the failure of the Son Tay rescue mission conducted in North Vietnam. By 1973 such missions would total 119, including 98 raids. Aiken would remain the only American ever to be recovered. [Taken from pownetwork.org]
    MORE
  • Remembering An American Hero

    Posted on 4/7/14 - by Curt Carter ccarter02@earthlink.net
    Dear SP4 Larry Delarnard Aiken, sir

    As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

    May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

    With respect, Sir

    Curt Carter
    MORE
  • Photo

    Posted on 7/18/11 - by Jerry Johnson, Jr. 4jjohnson@cox.net
    I took this picture at Ft. Jackson in AII. Our last conversation was on the beach at Chu Lai during stand-down.
    MORE
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The Wall of Faces

Brought to you by the organization that built The Wall, the Vietnam Veterans Virtual Memorial Wall is dedicated to honoring, remembering and sharing the legacies of all those who died in the Vietnam War. Here you can go beyond the names on The Wall to see the faces, share the stories and read the remembrances posted by friends, neighbors, classmates and family members.

All of these photos will be showcased in The Education Center at The Wall on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. To learn more about the effort to collect these photos and ensure their faces will never be forgotten, visit www.buildthecenter.org.