The Wall of Faces

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HAROLD ALVIN BIRD


is honored on Panel 2E, Line 86 of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

Leave a Remembrance

REMEMBRANCES

  • Remembered

    Posted on 3/18/17 - by Lucy Conte Micik bennysgift@gmail.com
    DEAR PETTY OFFICER HAROLD BIRD,
    THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE AS A HOSPITAL CORPSMAN 3RD CLASS WITH THE 3RD MARINES. SEMPER FI. THANKS FOR THE LIVES YOU SAVED. IT HAS BEEN FAR TOO LONG FOR ALL OF YOU TO HAVE BEEN GONE. WE APPRECIATE ALL YOU HAVE DONE, AND YOUR SACRIFICE. WATCH OVER THE U.S.A., IT STILL NEEDS YOUR COURAGE.. GOD BLESS YOU. MAY THE ANGELS BE AT YOUR SIDE. REST IN PEACE. MANY OF US HAVE BEGUN OUR JOURNEY TO EASTER. YOU ARE ALL IN OUR PRAYERS.
    MORE
  • Remembering Our Own

    Posted on 11/17/13 - by Robert L Nelson
    Harold Alvin Bird
    Harold was a corpsman who watched out for his marines
    during the attack on Da Nang.
    Harold Alvin Bird was born to Mr. and Mrs. Maurice A.
    Bird on August 5, 1943, in Clymer, New York. He and his
    brothers, Maurice Jr., Eugene and John, joined their parents
    in the family move to Lompoc, California; however, his
    sister Nancy remained in New York. Harold completed the
    first two years of high school at Lompoc in Santa Barbara
    County. After the family resettled in Boulder Creek in
    1960, he enrolled in San Lorenzo Valley High School and
    graduated with honors in 1962.
    Harold Bird enlisted in the local US Naval Reserve
    Surface Division and went on active duty in 1962. After
    completing training at the US Naval Training Center in
    San Diego, he was sent to a hospitalman school to become
    a navy hospitalman or marine corpsman. Bird, who considered
    making the navy his career, was promoted to hospital
    corpsman third class and sent to Camp Pendleton for field
    training. After graduation he was sent to Vietnam.
    Harold arrived in Vietnam on August 5, 1965 and was
    assigned to Charlie Company of the 1st Regiment, 1st
    Battalion of the 1st Marine Division. He had only been in
    Vietnam five weeks when Viet Cong guerillas attacked the
    Da Nang air base that his unit was guarding. In a predawn
    hand-to-hand assault on September 18, 1965, Hospitalman
    Third Class Harold Alvin Bird was shot and killed while
    attending to wounded marines.
    His body was recovered and returned to California where
    he was buried in the Golden Gate National Cemetery in San Bruno
    Source
    Remembering our Own
    The Santa Cruz County Military Roll of Honor 1861-2010
    By Robert L Nelson
    The Museum of Art & History @ The McPherson Center
    2010
    Page 205
    MORE
  • Semper Fi, Doc.

    Posted on 9/18/13 - by A Marine, USMC, Vietnam
    Semper Fi, Doc. Thank you for your devotion to our Country and to your Marines.
  • Remembering An American Hero

    Posted on 9/18/13 - by Curt Carter
    Dear HM3 Harold Alvin Bird, sir

    As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

    May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

    With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

    Curt Carter
    MORE
  • Harold A Bird

    Posted on 8/7/12 - by Tom Burgdorf Tommy.Burgdorf@Gmail.com

    Him in Uniform in Boulder Creek CA

    MORE
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The Wall of Faces

Brought to you by the organization that built The Wall, the Vietnam Veterans Virtual Memorial Wall is dedicated to honoring, remembering and sharing the legacies of all those who died in the Vietnam War. Here you can go beyond the names on The Wall to see the faces, share the stories and read the remembrances posted by friends, neighbors, classmates and family members.

All of these photos will be showcased in The Education Center at The Wall on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. To learn more about the effort to collect these photos and ensure their faces will never be forgotten, visit www.buildthecenter.org.