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JAMES ROBERT PANTALL


is honored on Panel 2W, Line 61 of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

Leave a Remembrance

REMEMBRANCES

  • A cousin I never knew

    Posted on 5/15/16 - by Albert D Wilson Jr commparts2@yahoo.com
    SGT James Robert Pantall was a second cousin that I never knew about until another member of our family started tracing our ancestry. Seems our great great grandfather built and ran the Pantall Hotel in downtown Puxatawney, PA. A couple of years back I stopped in Clymer, Pa to pay respects at James grave, but it was late on a Sunday and I couldn't find and directions to the cemetery. Strangely I was in country in Vietnam at the same time as James. Rest in peace cuz.
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  • Ground Casualty

    Posted on 4/27/14 - by wkillian@smjuhsd.org
    The 5th Transportation Command (Terminal) had the duty of running the extensive Qui Nhon port and served under the U.S. Army Support Command, Qui Nhon. The 5th Transportation Command was later deployed to Da Nang, and had battalions serving Vung Tau and Cat Lai. Among its duties were support of amphibious operation and supplying ammunition and ordnance to operational units, primarily by heavy boat. On the afternoon of November 2, 1970, SGT Dennis I. Day, SGT Richard C. Dority, SGT David L. Ginn, SGT Perry C. Kitchens, SGT Arlie R. Mangus, SGT Jerry D. Martin, SSGT Calvin A. Norris, SGT James R. Pantall, SFC John D. Shewmake, SGT David W. Woods, and PFC Billie H. Peeples were the crew of a landing craft, LCU #63, which departed Da Nang en route to Tan My, South Vietnam on a resupply mission. The LCU was a heavy craft able to carry large loads of ammunition. At 1010 hours on November 3, 1970, helicopter pilots sighted the craft capsized about 5 nautical miles south of Tan My port. In an initial search by air/sea rescue, however, no sign of the crew of the LCU were observed. There was no apparent hostile action, and the reason for the incident is unknown. On November 6, the remains of Billy H. Peoples were recovered near Cu Loi Island, fully rigged in a life jacket. During the period of December 4-20, attempts were made to salvage the craft and locate the crew. Divers gained access to all compartments and voids of the craft, but no survivors or evidence of remains were found. Pieces of clothing, small arms ammo, cans and a radio were recovered. On March 16, 1977, the body of Perry Kitchens was returned to U.S. control and subsequently positively identified. There has been no word of the rest of the crew. The missing eight men were all presumed to have drowned, and the U.S. Army believes there is no chance to ever recover the eight men missing from LCU-63. [Taken from pownetwork.org]
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  • Remembering An American Hero

    Posted on 10/24/13 - by Curt Carter ccarter02@earthlink.net
    Dear SGT James Robert Pantall, sir

    As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

    May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

    With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

    Curt Carter
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  • We Remember

    Posted on 8/5/11 - by Robert Sage rsage@austin.rr.com
    James has a military marker in his memory at Rowley Cemetery, Hillsdale, Indiana County,PA.
  • IN REMEMBRANCE OF THIS FINE YOUNG UNITED STATES ARMY SERVICEMAN WHOSE NAME SHALL LIVE FOREVER MORE

    Posted on 12/24/05 - by CLAY MARSTON CMARSTON@INTERLOG.COM


    SERGEANT

    JAMES ROBERT PANTALL


    served with the


    329th TRANSPORTATION COMPANY

    5th TRANSPORTATION COMMAND ( TERMINAL )


    The 5th Transportation Command ( Terminal ) had the duty of running the extensive Qui Nhon port and served under the United States Army Support Command, Qui Nhon.

    The 5th Transportation Command was later deployed to Da Nang, and had Battalions serving Vung Tau and Cat Lai.

    Among its duties were support of amphibious operation and supplying ammunition and ordnance to operational units, primarily by heavy boat.

    On the afternoon of 2 November 1970


    Sergeant
    Dennis Irvin Day

    Sergeant
    Richard Clair Dority

    Sergeant
    David Landrell Ginn

    Sergeant
    Perry Castellion Kitchens
    ( remains recovered )

    Sergeant
    Arlie Robert Mangus

    Sergeant
    Jerry Dean Martin

    Staff Sergeant
    Calvin Andrew Norris

    Sergeant
    James Robert Pantall

    Private First Class
    Billie Hammond Peeples
    ( remains recovered )

    Sergeant First Class
    John Daniel Shewmake Sr.

    and

    Sergeant
    David Walter Woods


    were the crew of a landing craft, LCU #63, which departed Da Nang en route to Tan My, South Vietnam on a resupply mission.

    The LCU was a heavy craft able to carry large loads of ammunition.

    At 1010 hours on 3 November 1970, helicopter pilots sighted the craft capsized about 5 nautical miles south of Tan My port.

    In an initial search by air/sea rescue, however, no sign of the crew of the LCU were observed.

    There was no apparent hostile action, and the reason for the incident is unknown.

    On 6 November 1970 the remains of Billy Hammond Peoples were recovered near Cu Loi Island, fully rigged in a life jacket.

    During the period of 4-20 December attempts were made to salvage the craft and locate the crew.

    Divers gained access to all compartments and voids of the craft, but no survivors or evidence of remains were found.

    Pieces of clothing, small arms ammunition, cans and a radio were recovered.

    On 16 March 1977 the body of Perry Kitchens was returned to United States control and subsequently positively identified.

    There has never been any further word of the remaining members of the crew.

    The missing nine men were all presumed to have drowned, and the U.S. Army believes there is no chance to ever recover the eight men missing from LCU-63.

    There are several discrepancies in the case of LCU-63 which should be noted.

    First of all, the United States Army, the United States State Department and the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Directory lists all the crew except Peeples as Sergeant, Staff Sergeant, or Sergeant First Class, which are ranks one grade above those listed by Defense Department and Joint Casualty Resolution Center records.

    The lower grades are listed as follows:

    Ginn, Martin, Pantall, Peeples -
    E3 or Private First Class;

    Day, Dority, Kitchens, Mangus and Woods - E4 -
    which can be either Corporal or Specialist 4;

    Norris - E5 or Sergeant;

    Shewmake - E6 or Staff Sergeant.

    Secondly, the Memorial Directory lists the entire crew with the exceptions of Peeples and Kitchens as missing on 4 November 1971 ( a year and a day later than all other records ).

    Third, the military occupational specialties of all 10 men on whom information can be gathered are classified.

    It was not uncommon for promotions to be given during the period between the time personnel went missing and the time they were declared dead.

    This group is classified as having had "non-hostile, died while missing" deaths, leading one to assume that for a brief time, at least, they were declared missing, so that it might be possible to have attained a grade increase during that period.

    It is uncommon, however for grade increases to be given to those whom are considered dead and non-recoverable.

    It was also uncommon for a group of 18 and 19 year-olds, as were most of this crew, to attain the rank of sergeant.

    Strange things have been known to happen regarding missing men.

    One pilot was declared dead because his aircraft exploded close to the ground.

    Later, the pilot, who had ejected in a cloud of smoke, and landed on the ground even before his parachute was fully deployed, was released from a POW camp.

    One Marine, Ronald Ridgeway, was declared dead and actually "buried" in a mass grave in the United States with other men from the same action, only to come home from a POW camp in 1973.

    Mistakes were made, and errors in judgement occurred.

    Given that the LCU sank with no witnesses, and sank in the proximity of an island, it is imaginable that the crew could have survived to be captured.

    This could be said to be supported by the fact that Peeples was found fully outfitted in his life jacket. It is, of course, only conjecture.





    YOU ARE NOT FORGOTTEN

    NOR SHALL YOU EVER BE



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The Wall of Faces

Brought to you by the organization that built The Wall, the Vietnam Veterans Virtual Memorial Wall is dedicated to honoring, remembering and sharing the legacies of all those who died in the Vietnam War. Here you can go beyond the names on The Wall to see the faces, share the stories and read the remembrances posted by friends, neighbors, classmates and family members.

All of these photos will be showcased in The Education Center at The Wall on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. To learn more about the effort to collect these photos and ensure their faces will never be forgotten, visit www.buildthecenter.org.