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LAWRENCE RICHARD MOYER


is honored on Panel 25E, Line 75 of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

Leave a Remembrance

REMEMBRANCES

  • Semper Fi

    Posted on 8/31/13 - by A Marine, USMC, Vietnam
    Semper Fi, Major.
  • Remembering An American Hero

    Posted on 8/29/13 - by Curt Carter
    Dear Major Lawrence Richard Moyer, sir

    As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

    May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

    With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

    Curt Carter
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  • Crash Information on U.S. Marine Corps helicopter CH-46A tail number 152569

    Posted on 12/6/12 - by wkillian@smjuhsd.org

    There is not a lot of information on this particular incident. From the combat chronology and other sources I have created the following narrative. This was a sad day. Since we had already had more than one CH-46 disintegrate in the air, everyone was waiting for the other shoe to drop. Many had long suspected there were problems with the structural integrity of the CH-46A, especially the aft pylon. As we continued to fly missions in support of BELT DRIVE, the lead aircraft on a med-evac mission, BuNo 152469 en route to the LPH-10, broke up in the air and the whole crew died along with the one embarked med-evac. There were no survivors. The pilot was MAJ Lawrence R. Moyer, co-pilot 2LT John D. Merriman, the crew chief was SGT Clement F. Lajeunesse and the gunner was LCPL Mike D. Laymon. The med-evac was PFC Danny W. Engesser. A similar accident took place at Marble Mountain the following day when another CH-46A lost its tail just as it touched down at Marble Mountain with no serious injuries to the crew. MAJ Moyer’s mission was primarily an administrative move to the carrier, so there was not a full crew aboard. The aircraft crashed into the sea. The cause of the crash was determined by the inspection of all CH-46As following the crash on 1 September mentioned above. As a result, all Alphas were then sent to Okinawa to have a pylon fix. Shortly after this time we did begin to have a normal crew size of five: pilot, copilot, crew chief, and two gunners. For the most part, we did not have dedicated medi-evac aircraft. The nearest aircraft to the casualty was detached from its regular mission to handle the evac. We found that we could get the casualties to the aid stations quicker this way than if the med-evac had to be launched from a remote base, as we would have thirty or so aircraft airborne from our group and in the general area at all times. The gunners all received first aid training before being assigned to an aircraft and performed some amazing life-saving feats. On assault landings, one or more primary med-evac aircraft were dedicated and they did have a corpsman aboard, as did those aircraft dedicated to med-evac outside of normal operating hours. Sometime, if things were expected to be really hairy, the squadron surgeon would accompany a flight. (Submitted by Neil Allen, HMM-262 historian) [Taken from vhpa.org]

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  • Remembrance

    Posted on 6/29/12 - by tonylama3@hotmail.com

    *

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  • My Father

    Posted on 11/15/11 - by Cindy Moyer Mashaintonio
    It has been over 44 years since my father was killed in Vietnam and I was not quite 2 years old, but there is not a day that goes by when he doesn't cross my mind. He is not forgotten by his children...Our Dad...Our Hero.
    MORE
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The Wall of Faces

Brought to you by the organization that built The Wall, the Vietnam Veterans Virtual Memorial Wall is dedicated to honoring, remembering and sharing the legacies of all those who died in the Vietnam War. Here you can go beyond the names on The Wall to see the faces, share the stories and read the remembrances posted by friends, neighbors, classmates and family members.

All of these photos will be showcased in The Education Center at The Wall on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. To learn more about the effort to collect these photos and ensure their faces will never be forgotten, visit www.buildthecenter.org.