The Wall of Faces

Advanced search +

VINCENT LOCATELLI


is honored on Panel 3E, Line 84 of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

Leave a Remembrance

REMEMBRANCES

  • Born in Italy, Drafted into the Infantry....KIA at only 20...Fighting for and With His Comrades

    Posted on 6/17/18 - by Izzy
    Vincent Locatelli
    Private First Class

    PERSONAL DATA
    Home of Record: Santa Cruz, California
    Date of birth: Tuesday, 03/27/1945

    MILITARY DATA
    Service: Army (Selective Service)
    Grade at loss: E3
    Rank: Private First Class
    ID No: 56368291
    MOS: 11A10 - Infantryman
    LenSvc: Between 1 and 2 years
    Unit: A CO, 1ST BN, 5TH CAV RGT, 1 CAV DIV

    CASUALTY DATA
    Start Tour: Monday, 08/16/1965
    Cas Date: Wednesday, 11/17/1965
    Age at Loss: 20
    Remains: Body Recovered
    Location: Ia Drang Valley, South Vietnam
    Type: Hostile, Died
    Reason: Multiple Fragmentation Wounds - Ground Casualty

    ON THE WALL Panel 03E Line 084
    MORE
  • KIA with 151 of his Comrades at Ambush at LZ Albany in the Infamous Ia Drang Valley Nov. 1965

    Posted on 6/17/18 - by K
    He was an Infantry Soldier..and died Soldier's Death....with his friends and comrades
    God Bless You Vinny
    And God Bless All who died with you that day
    America is Great because of you and your comrades' devotion to Duty while facing death
    MORE
  • Remembering Our Own

    Posted on 11/19/13 - by Robert L Nelson
    Vincent Locatelli
    A fellow soldier, Fred Owens, tells this story of Vincent’s
    final battle, “Company Commander Forrest said, ‘Who you
    got KIA?’ I said, ‘Locatelli.’ Forrest said, ‘Shit.’ Locatelli was
    the youngest guy in the company.”
    Vincent Locatelli was born in Italy on March 27, 1945,
    to Mr. and Mrs. Adolpho Locatelli. In addition to Vincent,
    the Locatelli family included sons Salvatore, Adolph, John,
    206 Remembering Our Own
    Joseph and Mario and daughter Angela. In 1950 the family
    moved to Santa Cruz, California and settled into a home
    on Younglove Street. Vincent attended local grammar
    schools and later studied at Santa Cruz High School.
    Upon completion of his education, he found employment
    at the Santa Cruz Portland Cement Company, where he
    worked until 1963.
    Vincent Locatelli was drafted into the US Army during the
    fall of 1963. After basic training, he was sent to Fort Carson,
    Colorado, for advanced training. In the early part of August
    1965, he was assigned to A Company, 1st Battalion of the 5th
    Cavalry Regiment in the 1st Cavalry Airmobile. After a brief
    orientation program at Fort Benning, Georgia, his unit left
    for Southeast Asia on September 20, 1965.
    Upon their arrival in Vietnam, the 1st Cavalry was sent
    to the Central Highland sector to prevent incursion by the
    Viet Cong and Viet regular units. Between September and
    November, Locatelli’s unit was engaged in several combat
    encounters with the enemy, but none of the magnitude of
    the combat in the La Drang Valley.
    On November 16, 1965, the 5th Regiment moved into
    the La Drang Valley in what was to become the first major
    US engagement of the Vietnam War. Along the route, the
    550-yard column was brought to a halt and company commanders
    were ordered forward for consultation. During
    this period, the enemy ambushed the column in several
    locations. The fighting took place in three- to five-foot elephant
    grass that prevented either side from seeing the other
    and during the wild shooting melee, friendly fire casualties
    frequently occurred.
    In the A Company sector, “Charley” as VC soldiers were
    dubbed, hurled grenades and on November 17, a grenade
    exploded near Private Vincent Locatelli taking his life.
    Vincent Locatelli’s remains were returned to Santa Cruz
    and following a funeral service at Holy Cross Church, were
    entombed in the Holy Cross Mausoleum.
    Source
    Remembering our Own
    The Santa Cruz County Military Roll of Honor 1861-2010
    By Robert L Nelson
    The Museum of Art & History @ The McPherson Center
    2010
    Page 205
    MORE
  • Remembering Our Own

    Posted on 11/19/13 - by R
    Vincent Locatelli
    A fellow soldier, Fred Owens, tells this story of Vincent’s
    final battle, “Company Commander Forrest said, ‘Who you
    got KIA?’ I said, ‘Locatelli.’ Forrest said, ‘Shit.’ Locatelli was
    the youngest guy in the company.”
    Vincent Locatelli was born in Italy on March 27, 1945,
    to Mr. and Mrs. Adolpho Locatelli. In addition to Vincent,
    the Locatelli family included sons Salvatore, Adolph, John,
    206 Remembering Our Own
    Joseph and Mario and daughter Angela. In 1950 the family
    moved to Santa Cruz, California and settled into a home
    on Younglove Street. Vincent attended local grammar
    schools and later studied at Santa Cruz High School.
    Upon completion of his education, he found employment
    at the Santa Cruz Portland Cement Company, where he
    worked until 1963.
    Vincent Locatelli was drafted into the US Army during the
    fall of 1963. After basic training, he was sent to Fort Carson,
    Colorado, for advanced training. In the early part of August
    1965, he was assigned to A Company, 1st Battalion of the 5th
    Cavalry Regiment in the 1st Cavalry Airmobile. After a brief
    orientation program at Fort Benning, Georgia, his unit left
    for Southeast Asia on September 20, 1965.
    Upon their arrival in Vietnam, the 1st Cavalry was sent
    to the Central Highland sector to prevent incursion by the
    Viet Cong and Viet regular units. Between September and
    November, Locatelli’s unit was engaged in several combat
    encounters with the enemy, but none of the magnitude of
    the combat in the La Drang Valley.
    On November 16, 1965, the 5th Regiment moved into
    the La Drang Valley in what was to become the first major
    US engagement of the Vietnam War. Along the route, the
    550-yard column was brought to a halt and company commanders
    were ordered forward for consultation. During
    this period, the enemy ambushed the column in several
    locations. The fighting took place in three- to five-foot elephant
    grass that prevented either side from seeing the other
    and during the wild shooting melee, friendly fire casualties
    frequently occurred.
    In the A Company sector, “Charley” as VC soldiers were
    dubbed, hurled grenades and on November 17, a grenade
    exploded near Private Vincent Locatelli taking his life.
    Vincent Locatelli’s remains were returned to Santa Cruz
    and following a funeral service at Holy Cross Church, were
    entombed in the Holy Cross Mausoleum.
    Source
    Remembering our Own
    The Santa Cruz County Military Roll of Honor 1861-2010
    By Robert L Nelson
    The Museum of Art & History @ The McPherson Center
    2010
    Page 205
    MORE
  • Remembering An American Hero

    Posted on 10/26/13 - by Curt Carter ccarter02@earthlink.net
    Dear PFC Vincent Locatelli, sir

    As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

    May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

    With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

    Curt Carter
    MORE
1 2

The Wall of Faces

Brought to you by the organization that built The Wall, the Vietnam Veterans Virtual Memorial Wall is dedicated to honoring, remembering and sharing the legacies of all those who died in the Vietnam War. Here you can go beyond the names on The Wall to see the faces, share the stories and read the remembrances posted by friends, neighbors, classmates and family members.

All of these photos will be showcased in The Education Center at The Wall on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. To learn more about the effort to collect these photos and ensure their faces will never be forgotten, visit www.buildthecenter.org.