The Wall of Faces

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ROY ROBERT KUBLEY


is honored on Panel 14E, Line 100 of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

Leave a Remembrance

REMEMBRANCES

  • To The Ranch

    Posted on 12/25/15 - by S. A. Aigner
    A big smile, a fearless pilot drawn to the action, MIA, still miss ya Kubes.
  • Always With Me

    Posted on 4/6/15 - by James P. Morgan, LTC, USAF, Ret minerjp@yahoo.com
    Roy and I went to Louisville, Ky while at Nashville, TN, going through C-130 training. Had a blast, becoming KY Cols for the night. Later, we both served at Evreux, France. He was instrumental in getting some furniture for my wife's and I in our off base housing. Stole it from the BOQ. I remember to this day Roy having dinner with us in our modest, almost furnished house in Everux. Later, in the Vietnam days, I was an Air Force liaison officer with the 3rd Brigade of the 1st Infantry division at Lai Khe, just north of Saigon. Roy was shot down in his C-123 but survived the crash and was rescued. A "glad to be alive" party ensued at the Saigon Officer's club. I hitched a ride down there and celebrated with Roy. That was the last time I saw him. I miss him to this day.
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  • Final Mission of CAPT Roy R. Kubley

    Posted on 9/13/14 - by wkillian@smjuhsd.org
    MAJ Lloyd F. Walker was the pilot of a 12th Air Commando Squadron UC-123B which was sent on a defoliation mission on January 31, 1967. His crew that day included CAPT Howard L. Barden, CAPT Roy R. Kubley, CAPT Harvey Mulhauser, and A1C Ronald K. Miyazaki, the flight mechanic. The aircraft had leveled off and started spraying when it suddenly inverted and crashed. Further investigation revealed that hostile fire struck the propeller causing the crash. The crash occurred about 5 miles south-southwest of Sepone in Savannakhet Province, Laos. All crewmembers were eventually determined to have been killed in the crash of the aircraft. [Narrative taken from pownetwork.org; image from wikipedia.org]
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  • Wisconsin 37 POW/MIA Tribute

    Posted on 8/24/14 - by Jeff Doc Dentice
    Roy Kubley is remembered on Docs Wisconsin 37 Tribute page, along with all the WI. Vietnam War POW/MIA. www.war-veterans.org/Wi37.htm
  • Final Mission of CAPT Roy R. Kubley

    Posted on 5/6/14 - by wkillian@smjuhsd.org
    The Fairchild C-123 "Provider" was aircraft based on an all-metal glider designed by Chase Aircraft and was the first transport to see Vietnam service. The Provider, when it was in camouflage paint with mottled topside and light bottom side, resembled an arched-back whale suspended from the bottom midpoint of huge dorsal wings. One of the Provider versions was the UC-123B of Project Ranch Hand. Ranch Hand aircraft sprayed pesticides for malaria prevention and herbicides, including Agent Orange, which destroyed both the forest that concealed the Viet Cong and the rice and manioc plant that fed them. MAJ Lloyd F. Walker was the pilot of a 12th Air Commando Squadron UC-123B which was sent on a defoliation mission on January 31, 1967. His crew that day included CAPT Howard L. Barden, CAPT Roy R. Kubley, CAPT Harvey Mulhauser, and A1C Ronald K. Miyazaki, the flight mechanic. The aircraft had leveled off and started spraying when it suddenly inverted and crashed. Further investigation revealed that hostile fire struck the propeller causing the crash. The crash occurred about 5 miles south-southwest of Sepone in Savannakhet Province, Laos. All crewmembers were eventually determined to have been killed in the crash of the aircraft. [Narrative taken from pownetwork.org; image from wikipedia.org]
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The Wall of Faces

Brought to you by the organization that built The Wall, the Vietnam Veterans Virtual Memorial Wall is dedicated to honoring, remembering and sharing the legacies of all those who died in the Vietnam War. Here you can go beyond the names on The Wall to see the faces, share the stories and read the remembrances posted by friends, neighbors, classmates and family members.

All of these photos will be showcased in The Education Center at The Wall on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. To learn more about the effort to collect these photos and ensure their faces will never be forgotten, visit www.buildthecenter.org.