The Wall of Faces

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STEVEN BRYCE JOHNSTON


is honored on Panel 1W, Line 108 of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

Leave a Remembrance

REMEMBRANCES

  • The Ultimate Sacrifice was made by this Corps member, who was killed during the Vietnam War.

    Posted on 6/11/16 - by thomas r bailey '63 TAMU thomas@hal-pc.opg
    The Corps of Cadets and Texas A&M University
    Salute: Capt. Steven B Johnston '68
    “The Memorial for Vietnam Era”
    “Corps Plaza Memorial”
    College Station, Texas
    For more information or adding information contact:
    Sam Houston Sanders Corps of Cadets Center 1400 TAMU College Station, TX 77843-1400 (979) 862-2862 http://corps.tamu.edu/contact-us
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  • Final Mission of CAPT Steven B. Johnston

    Posted on 5/4/14 - by wkillian@smjuhsd.org
    The Phantom, used by Air Force, Marine and Navy air wings, served a multitude of functions including fighter-bomber and interceptor, photo and electronic surveillance. The two man aircraft was extremely fast (Mach 2), and had a long range (900 - 2300 miles, depending on stores and mission type). The F-4 was also extremely maneuverable and handled well at low and high altitudes. The F-4 was selected for a number of state-of-the-art electronics conversions, which improved radar intercept and computer bombing capabilities enormously. Most pilots considered it one of the "hottest" planes around. Air Force CAPT Steven B. Johnston was the weapons systems officer on an F-4D fighter jet which was performing an operational mission in Laos on January 4, 1973. The aircraft was struck by hostile fire, forcing Johnston and the pilot to eject. Voice contact was established with the pilot immediately upon landing. CAPT Johnston had landed under a large tree limb and appeared to have a broken neck. Examination of the body revealed no signs of life. His body could not be recovered due to darkness and hostile fire in the area. The pilot, fortunately, was rescued. [Taken from pownetwork.org]
    MORE
  • Remembering An American Hero

    Posted on 11/8/13 - by Curt Carter ccarter02@earthlink.net
    Dear Captain Steven Bryce Johnston, sir

    As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

    May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

    With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

    Curt Carter
    MORE
  • If I should die...remembrances for CAPT. Steven Bryce JOHNSTON, USAF...Muskogee's bravest of heroes!

    Posted on 11/25/08
    If I should die, and leave you here awhile, be not like others, sore undone, who keep long vigils by the silent dust, and weep..for MY sake, turn again to life, and smile...Nerving thy heart, and trembling hand to do something to comfort other hearts than thine..Complete these dear, unfinished tasks of mine...and I, perchance, may therein comfort you.
    MORE
  • On Silver Wings

    Posted on 1/4/07 - by Dave Avery averyds@carrollsweb.com
    On Silver Wings
    They Flew The Skies
    These Brave Young Men
    Who Fought And Died
    When Duty Called
    They Went So Brave
    Now Families Mourn
    Beside Their Grave
    Who Can Forget
    What Courage They Had
    Some Have,Some Did
    And That's So Sad
    MORE
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The Wall of Faces

Brought to you by the organization that built The Wall, the Vietnam Veterans Virtual Memorial Wall is dedicated to honoring, remembering and sharing the legacies of all those who died in the Vietnam War. Here you can go beyond the names on The Wall to see the faces, share the stories and read the remembrances posted by friends, neighbors, classmates and family members.

All of these photos will be showcased in The Education Center at The Wall on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. To learn more about the effort to collect these photos and ensure their faces will never be forgotten, visit www.buildthecenter.org.