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DWANE LONNIE ADAMS


is honored on Panel 35W, Line 86 of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

Leave a Remembrance

REMEMBRANCES

  • Brother You Are Remembered.

    Posted on 5/27/18 - by Steve Hoy ctrippleducedaytrip@earthlink.net
    Dwane was an Indirect Fire Infantryman in our Mortar platoon with the 2nd Battalion 22nd Mechanized Infantry [Triple Duce] 25th Infantry Division. While we were awaiting our orders and assignment to our field units, I met Dwane at the 90th Replacement adjacent to Camp Alpha. We received our orders to report to the 25th Division basecamp at Cu Chi. We hopped aboard a C-123 transport plane and off we went. Upon arriving at Cu Chi, we were sent to a mandatory orientation training that takes three or four days to complete. This training gave us some perspective on what combat would be like, pointed out the hazards of booby traps, and gave us some idea of what to expect from the local people and ARVN troops. Upon completing the 25th I.D. training class at Cui Chi, we were ordered to report to C Company 2nd Battalion, 22nd Mechanized Infantry [Triple Duce] at Dau Tieng [also known as Camp Rainer]. That next morning we went over to the airport and boarded a C-7A Caribou [STOL capability] which is a small high winged, twin engine aircraft for the short hop up to Dau Tieng. When our plane landed at Dau Tieng it felt like we diving down or dropping out of the sky onto their small airstrip. It felt like you were riding down the steep drop of a roller coaster at Six Flags. We were told that the plane needed to avoid any sniper fire from the surrounding canopy of the Michelin Rubber Plantation and that it was a very short runway. Our basecamp at Dau Tieng was named after a dormant volcano in Washington State called Mt. Rainer. Camp Rainer basecamp was located about 60 miles northwest of Saigon. It was located between the Ben Cui rubber plantation and the Saigon River on the [left] western side and on the [right] eastern side was the Michelin Rubber Plantation. The village of Dau Tieng is located on southwest side of Camp Rainer near the Saigon River. We were told that the village had a history as a VC village. The Michelin Rubber Plantation supplied rubber to the Michelin Rubber Factory near the Saigon River. The Triple Duce headquarters was located at the North section of Camp Rainer. When we both arrived at our company headquarters, Dwane was told to report to the 4th platoon [Mortar] platoon and I was told to report to the 1st platoon. On 14 January 1969 C Company was a reactionary force for B Company Triple Duce. B Company was engaged with a North Vietnamese Army [NVA] force in a firefight. B Company was a reactionary force to a convoy that had been ambushed by the NVA east of the Dau Tieng and Tay Ninh crossroads. When C Company began moving through the rubber plantation we came under intense fire from a well-fortified enemy force in bunkers. One of our officers [1st Lt. Warren] in complete disregard his safety, along with several of his men began maneuvering through the hail of enemy fire toward the hostile bunker positions. A frag that was thrown by the NVA towards the group and [1st Lt. Warren] fell in the direction of the frag, thus shielding those around him from the blast. He saved 3 men from serious or mortal injury. We fought with the NVA until it was approaching dusk and then we moved south across the roadway to set up a nighttime logger in a rice paddy area. C Company set up in our regular circular formation with APC’s on the outside of the perimeter and the command, mortars and support in the center area. My APC was on the side of the perimeter close to Dwane’s mortar squad APC. I was preparing my fighting position and watching our mortar brothers preparing their fire zones. The NVA also had their mortar / fighting positions on side of the roadway where our nighttime logger was positioned. Dwane’s squad started firing mortar rounds into the area surrounding our night logger. In order to have room to work their ramp was down on the ground. I observed a large explosion coming from Dwane’s APC. At the same time of the explosion I observed their NCO being blown out the back of their mortar APC by the blast. There was an accident with the mortar tube. We had to very quickly climb inside our APC to protect ourselves from the flying shrapnel. Because of the numerous explosions, we needed to move to a new logger location far enough away to avoid being injured. That day C Company lost six of our brothers. Brother you are remembered and my heart remains heavy with your loss. Triple Duce, DEEDS NOT WORDS!
    MORE
  • Aug 17 2016

    Posted on 8/17/16 - by jayne t rose medpronurse@AOL.COM
    You where my brother-in law and I loved you. I followed in your foot steps i went in the ARMY and did 20 years as a nurse. I will always remember you in my heart.
    MORE
  • Remembered

    Posted on 7/18/16 - by Lucy Conte Micik
    DEAR PFC ADAMS,

    THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE TO THIS NATION. YOUR SACRIFICE IS APPRECIATED.

    REST IN PEACE....
    MORE
  • Remembering An American Hero

    Posted on 2/21/14 - by Curt Carter ccarter02@earthlink.net
    Dear PFC Dwane Lonnie Adams, sir

    As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

    May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

    With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

    Curt Carter
    MORE
  • Remembrance

    Posted on 5/9/13 - by Harless Belcher harlessbelcher@yahoo.com

    Dwane you died doing what you were trained for. A hero for sure. Rest in peace

    MORE
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The Wall of Faces

Brought to you by the organization that built The Wall, the Vietnam Veterans Virtual Memorial Wall is dedicated to honoring, remembering and sharing the legacies of all those who died in the Vietnam War. Here you can go beyond the names on The Wall to see the faces, share the stories and read the remembrances posted by friends, neighbors, classmates and family members.

All of these photos will be showcased in The Education Center at The Wall on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. To learn more about the effort to collect these photos and ensure their faces will never be forgotten, visit www.buildthecenter.org.