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JAMES ALBERT BAILEY


is honored on Panel 7W, Line 122 of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

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REMEMBRANCES

  • You answered - i could not - "I shall die, but that is all I shall do for death" - Edna st Vincent

    Posted on 10/12/17 - by Jim, Jimmer Jaimie Seamus Seemus Bailey facebooke blogjbailey@gmail.com
    "Was it for this the clay grew tall
    Oh what made fatuous sunbeams toil
    To break earth's sleep at all?"
    Wilfred Owen
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  • Remembered

    Posted on 10/22/16 - by Lucy Conte Micik bennysgift@gmail.com
    DEAR CHIEF WARRANT OFFICER,
    THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE AS A UTILITY - OBSERVATION HELICOPTER PILOT. HALLOWEEN IS APPROACHING, AND ALL SAINTS AND ALL SOULS' DAYS - THE DAYS WE HONOR THOSE WHO LEFT US. MAY THE SAINTS AND ANGELS GUIDE YOU. REST IN PEACE.
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  • Final Mission of CW4 James W. Bailey

    Posted on 11/16/14 - by wkillian@smjuhsd.org
    On October 9, 1969, a UH-1H helicopter crew and passengers were attempting an extraction from a mined pickup zone in eastern Long Khanh Province, South Vietnam near the shores of the Song Dong Nai River. During the extraction attempt, the helicopter's rotor blade struck a bamboo thicket, causing the loss of rotor RPM's and lift capability. The helicopter began losing altitude, turned right and headed west and downriver in an attempt to regain air speed. Shortly thereafter, the aircraft struck 15-20 feet of water in an almost level attitude, and sank on its left side in less than 10 seconds. Immediate and continuous air and water searches, loudspeaker broadcasts, and phamplet distributions were conducted during the period of 9-15 October and 19-21 October, suspended October 16-18 only because of poor weather conditions. No recovery was made of any of those missing from the aircraft, but the remains of two personnel aboard were located and subsequently identified. The waters of the Song Dong Nai River were swift and treacherous. A LRRP swimmer trying to inspect the site had difficulty staying afloat even with a rope. The individual reported that equipment seen on the shore after the crash appeared to be alternately submerged and then reappear. It could not be determined at the time how many persons escaped the aircraft. One who was known to escape (unnamed in Army records) reported that he could not make it to shore and went under. Another survivor reported seeing him go down within 3-4 feet of him, but never saw him again. One of the individuals who was initially seen to survive, later drowned or was lost in the incident. The only survivor of the original crash was WO Kilbourne, the pilot. The two remains located were identified as the crew chief, who had survived the immediate crash, but later drowned. CW4 James W. Bailey, the aircraft commander, was lost and his remains were recovered. SGT Dallas A. Driver, SGT Jimmy R. Garbett, SGT Raymond G. Moore, SGT James L. Suydam and SP5 James H. Turner were listed as Killed, Body Not Recovered. Since their remains were never found, they are listed with honor among the missing. [Taken from pownetwork.org]
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  • Final Mission of CW4 James A. Bailey

    Posted on 10/8/14
    On October 10, 1970, a UH-1H helicopter crew and passengers were attempting an extraction from a mined pick-up zone in eastern Long Khanh Province, South Vietnam, near the shores of the Song Dong Nai River. During the extraction attempt, the helicopter's rotor blade struck trees, causing the loss of rotor RPM's and lift capability. The helicopter began losing altitude, turned right and headed west and downriver in an attempt to regain air speed. Shortly thereafter, the aircraft struck 15-20 feet of water in an almost level attitude, and sank on its left side in less than 10 seconds. Immediate and continuous air and water searches, loudspeaker broadcasts, and phamplet distributions were conducted during the period of 9-15 October and 19-21 October, suspended October 16-18 only because of poor weather conditions. No recovery was made of any of those missing from the aircraft, but the remains of two personnel aboard were located and subsequently identified. A LRRP swimmer trying to inspect the site had difficulty staying afloat. The individual reported that equipment seen on the shore after the crash appeared to be alternately submerged and then reappear. It could not be determined at the time how many persons escaped the aircraft. One who was known to escape (unnamed in Army records) reported that he could not make it to shore and went under. Another survivor reported seeing him go down within 3-4 feet of him, but never saw him again. One of the individuals who was initially seen to survive, later drowned or was lost in the incident. The only survivor of the original crash was WO Kilbourne, the pilot. The waters of the Song Dong Nai River were swift and treacherous. It is particularly tragic that men who survived an aircraft would drown trying to reach safety. The two remains located were identified as the crew chief, who had survived the immediate crash, but later drowned. CW4 James A. Bailey, the aircraft commander, was lost and his remains were recovered. Others who perished in the crash included SGT Dallas A. Driver, SGT Jimmy R. Garbett, SGT Raymond G. Moore and SP5 James H. Turner. All were listed as Killed, Body Not Recovered. Since their remains were never found, they are listed with honor among the missing. [Taken from pownetwork.org]
    MORE
  • Respected Uncle

    Posted on 5/14/14 - by Ed Rosner
    Skipped his high school graduation to join the Navy during WWII. Moved on to Army paratroopers and finally to an Army helicopter pilot.
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The Wall of Faces

Brought to you by the organization that built The Wall, the Vietnam Veterans Virtual Memorial Wall is dedicated to honoring, remembering and sharing the legacies of all those who died in the Vietnam War. Here you can go beyond the names on The Wall to see the faces, share the stories and read the remembrances posted by friends, neighbors, classmates and family members.

All of these photos will be showcased in The Education Center at The Wall on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. To learn more about the effort to collect these photos and ensure their faces will never be forgotten, visit www.buildthecenter.org.