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JEFFREY LEE GELDIN

JEFFREY LEE
GELDIN
  • Wall Name:JEFFREY L GELDIN
  • Date of Birth:2/17/1949
  • Date of Casualty:6/2/1969
  • Home of Record:LINDSEY
  • County of Record:SANDUSKY COUNTY
  • State:OH
  • Branch of Service:ARMY
  • Rank:SP4
  • Panel/Row:23W, 44
  • Casualty Province:TAY NINH

MARVIN JOSEPH GUDE

MARVIN JOSEPH
GUDE
  • Wall Name:MARVIN J GUDE
  • Date of Birth:10/5/1948
  • Date of Casualty:6/2/1969
  • Home of Record:TAMPA
  • County of Record:HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
  • State:FL
  • Branch of Service:ARMY
  • Rank:SP4
  • Panel/Row:23W, 44
  • Casualty Province:PLEIKU

JAMES ROBSON GILMORE JR


is honored on Panel 23W, Row 44 of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

Leave a Remembrance

REMEMBRANCES

  • I knew him in high school

    Posted on 11/21/14 - by Bill Stevens
    A couple of years ago, my parents told me that “Jimmy” Gilmore had been killed in Vietnam. He and I were best friends during our sophomore year of high school in Alamogordo, New Mexico. I only lived at Holloman AFB for that one year (’60-’61), but Jimmy and I became good friends during that time.

    We had a lot of great times together that year. We were both members of the Junior Classical League (aka Latin Club). Jimmy had a ’49 Chevrolet that we sometimes got to use for our “wheels” to go into Alamogordo to Latin Club meetings. We liked to think we were a little bit wild, but in truth we were both pretty tame and well behaved (at least around adults).

    We didn’t keep in touch after I moved from Holloman, but I always remember Jim as a good friend. He always was the leader for the two of us. In ’67 I was sent to Korea instead of Vietnam but kept up in the Stars and Stripes with those who had died each week in ‘Nam. I looked mainly for those I had known in college, basic training, and AIT. At that time I wasn’t thinking about childhood friends that might be over there also. When I did hear about Jim a couple of years ago, I again recalled all of the good times we had together. I was very glad to find this website with his picture and these postings from his friends.

    It’s unfortunate that so many young men had to lose their lives in Vietnam, but it is more important that many young men were willing to “serve” their country. They should always be held as a shining example for today’s youth.

    As others have done, I just feel compelled to add this to “Jimmy’s” wall and let others know that he was a great person, even during his earlier years.
    MORE
  • Remembering An American Hero

    Posted on 11/29/13 - by Curt Carter ccarter02@earthlink.net
    Dear 1LT James Robson Gilmore Jr, sir

    As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

    May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

    With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

    Curt Carter
    MORE
  • Flew together in Vietnam

    Posted on 4/10/13 - by Robert Monroe Jake 71

    I flew with Jim that morning and finished his Quang Tin Province VR (visual recon) checkout. I was FAC duty officer for Jim's afternoon FAC mission and received TIC (Troops in Contact) a couple miles from Tam Ky's runway. I asked him to check out the area which usually broke up the TIC as soon as the FAC showed up. But this was a trap as they had setup a .30 CAL automatic weapon that did not fire until he flew over the sight and was shot down and killed. I flew out to the crash site by helicopter and took photos of the .30 CAL holes in the O-2A aircraft.

    MORE
  • We Remember

    Posted on 1/10/12 - by Robert Sage rsage@austin.rr.com
    James is buried at Marietta National Cemetery.
    MORE
  • I had his MIA

    Posted on 3/11/08 - by Kat kenz12@gmail.com
    Thanx.
  • NEVER FORGOTTEN

    Posted on 4/20/06 - by Bill Nelson grite@yahoo.com
    FOREVER REMEMBERED

    "If you are able, save for them a place inside of you....and save one backward glance when you are leaving for the places they can no longer go.....Be not ashamed to say you loved them....
    Take what they have left and what they have taught you with their dying and keep it with your own....And in that time when men decide and feel safe to call the war insane, take one moment to embrace those gentle heroes you left behind...."

    Quote from a letter home by Maj. Michael Davis O'Donnell
    KIA 24 March 1970. Distinguished Flying Cross: Shot down and Killed while attempting to rescue 8 fellow soldiers surrounded by attacking enemy forces.

    We Nam Brothers pause to give a backward glance, and post this remembrance to you, one of the gentle heroes lost to the War in Vietnam:
    ... and rest forever in the shade of our love, brother.

    From your Nam-Band-Of-Brothers
    MORE
  • Moody AFB Class 69-01 roommate

    Posted on 4/4/05 - by Lee F Richmond leefrich@earthlink.net
    Jim and I were roommates in pilot training along with our third roomie, Jack Welde. When I retired at 60 last year after a career in both the Air Force and in commercial aviation I thought how fortunate I was to do all these things and Jim's life was cut short and he didn't have the chance to experience them. I went to the wall in March 2005 and lingered at Jim's name and choked up and thought of all the times we had in pilot training In August of 1968 we went on to our next assignment and our lives.I've thought of Jim all these years and wish that he could have known a full and lengthy life. At that time any one of us could have had our lives cut short. I was one of the guys who has the time now in retirement to think of Jim and the sacrifice he made.God bless him.
    MORE
  • 23W-Line 44

    Posted on 12/23/03 - by Brian DeLuca ketone64@comcast.net
    THE WALL IS A TRAGIC, AND A MAGIC PLACE.
    SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT -- 23W-LINE 44:

    [sent to daughter of a friend from my RF-4C 14TacReconSq, Udorn RTAFB - I flew Recce after the C-141A]

    Your Dad and I lost many friends to the Wall - some hurt us more than others, in a deep and personal and visceral way, beyond our expected grieving for a fallen friend. Such was 23W-Line 44 in my life, Jim Gilmore.

    He and I were close friends and classmates at the Academy, ‘67 - we were brothers under the skin in so many ways. After pilot training, Jim headed to Danang to be a Forward Air Controller in light planes. In Jun 69 while a C-141 pilot at Travis AFB, I got the word that he had been shot down/killed. It was like they ripped a piece of my body off - I spent many years fantasizing that it was just another one of his practical jokes and that one day the door would knock and he'd be there with his broad grin and the notice that I'd have to really work to top that one!

    In November 1983, I was visiting my parents in New Jersey for my 20th High School Reunion.
    I anticipated going to The Wall for months already, to settle the fantasy that I wanted to go on forever.
    I asked my parents to take a day and go to DC - I was so calm in my request that they had no hint at the drama to come. It seemed like a proper thing to do with the opportunity available – “OK, let's all go”.

    I drove and as we approached the city, I began that uncontrolled nervousness that you feel when you know you can't turn back from fear - in this case the fear of the final knowledge that Jim is/was dead after all.

    My conversation ceased except for minimal comments about where to park - we found a spot at the Mall.
    I began slowly walking ahead of my parents on that beautiful crisp Fall day - I was on my way to see my friend's fate, hoping against hope that he wasn't on the Wall (once again, fantasy). I slowed as I got near the site (stalling with fear); my parents caught up with me and we went to the directory book and looked for Jim's name. My heart was pushing out of my chest. As my finger traced down the page, there it was - 23W Line 44. I almost collapsed. I turned and walked briskley to the panel, as though I was totally alone - although the area was quite crowded that day.

    I stopped and faced the Wall - the piccadors were gone, and now I had to face the bull.

    My parents had caught up again and were standing about 15 feet behind me, allowing me some private time (in the crowd all around me.) My eyes found the name - once again I almost collapsed.

    My fingers went forward and in the very instant that they touched Jim’s name, 14 years of denial left my body and I fell against his name and began heavy grieving sobbing. People all around very kindly and reverantly respected my reunion and quietly moved around me. My mother ran up and hugged and consoled me but I was so overcome that I pushed her away and went back to holding my friends name, pushing my hand into it trying to make contact - all the time sobbing unmanly and uncontrollably. My Dad came and asked Mom to let me be alone for a while and he told me they'd be nearby.

    One of the old onsite Veteran Park Rangers came by and softly talked with me and asked me to tell him about Jim. He listened, as someone probably once listened to him about a fallen comrade.
    After about 15 minutes, I calmed down - all during that time everyone around was very respectful of my emotions - it's that kind of place.

    I returned to my parents and told them that this moment had finally settled years of baggage and in this domain, I could now go on with some settlement of my relationship with Jim. I visit Jim, and others on THE WALL, when I'm in DC - but that day was the needed catharsis.

    THE WALL IS A TRAGIC, AND A MAGIC PLACE.

    Brian DeLuca USAFA '67 < ketone64@comcast.net >
    MORE
  • Thank You

    Posted on 10/1/03 - by Kelsey Robson kel_r@hotmail.com
    To Mr. Gilmore, Thank you for your service in the war. I respect that there were people like you that were willing to pay the ultimate price for the good of others. Kelsey Robson
    MORE
  • Thank you

    Posted on 5/28/03 - by Andrea Mary
    Thank you for serving our country. I would like to leave you a Bible verse: "Greater love has no one than this, that he lay down his life for his friends." John 15:13. I believe you have demonstrated this verse, and I would like your family to know that I have prayed for them.
    MORE
  • Thank You

    Posted on 5/27/03 - by Matt Burdick
    I never knew you, or knew of you, but I appreciate what you did for this country. It takes a special person to fight for their country.Thank You
    MORE
  • Thank You

    Posted on 3/17/03
    I never had the opportunity to meet you, so you are probably wondering why I am writing on your behalf. I just want to take a few minutes and thank you for what you did for this country. You are a hero in my eyes. You gave all that you could possibly give, your life. I just want to let you know I deeply appreciate it.
    Sincerely,
    Jamie Gilmore
    MORE
  • U.S. Air Force Academy

    Posted on 1/27/03 - by USAFA AOG
    Photo provided by:
    United States Air Force Academy
    Association of Graduates
    MORE
  • Graduation Photo

    Posted on 1/7/03 - by Bill Marvel, USAFA '69
    Jim is a graduate of the USAF Academy, Class of 1967. This is his senior year photograph and year book entry.
    MORE
  • Remembering A Lost Brother

    Posted on 9/3/02 - by Jim Meade
    ""Jake" FAC James Gilmore lost while supporting the 4th Infantry Division 2 Jun 69.
    MORE
  • IN REMEMBRANCE OF THIS GRADUATE OF THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCE ACADEMY WHOSE NAME SHALL LIVE FOREVER MORE

    Posted on 4/24/00 - by CLAY MARSTON cmarston@interlog.com


    1st LIEUTENANT

    JAMES ROBSON GILMORE JR


    PILOT

    20th TACTICAL AIR SUPPORT SQUADRON

    DA NANG AIR BASE - SOUTH VIETNAM



    WAS A DISTINGUISHED GRADUATE OF THE

    UNITED STATES AIR FORCE ACADEMY

    AT COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO

    IN THE CLASS OF 1967



    WHO LOST HIS YOUNG LIFE

    WHILE ON AN AIR MISSION

    OVER SOUTH VIETNAM





    YOU ARE NOT FORGOTTEN
    NOR SHALL YOU EVER BE



    MORE

The Wall of Faces

Brought to you by the organization that built The Wall, the Vietnam Veterans Virtual Memorial Wall is dedicated to honoring, remembering and sharing the legacies of all those who died in the Vietnam War. Here you can go beyond the names on The Wall to see the faces, share the stories and read the remembrances posted by friends, neighbors, classmates and family members.

All of these photos will be showcased in The Education Center at The Wall on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. To learn more about the effort to collect these photos and ensure their faces will never be forgotten, visit www.buildthecenter.org.