The Wall of Faces

Advanced search +

LOUIS WAYNE FRERICKS


is honored on Panel 29W, Line 19 of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

Leave a Remembrance

REMEMBRANCES

  • Gary e Wilson, 1st inf. Div. 1st.&18th. C co. RVN 68/69

    Posted on 9/22/14
    LT. Frericks was the best,3rd. plt. would follow him anywhere. LT. is what we called him, knew we was walking into an ambush that day. but our C.O. would not listen.
    MORE
  • Remembering An American Hero

    Posted on 3/19/14 - by Curt Carter ccarter02@earthlink.net
    Dear 1LT Louis Wayne Frericks, sir

    As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

    May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

    With respect, Sir

    Curt Carter
    MORE
  • Distinguished Service Cross Citation

    Posted on 3/12/13 - by A Vietnam Vet.

    Distinguished Service Cross



    Awarded posthumously for actions during the Vietnam War



    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Louis Wayne Frericks, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 18th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Frericks distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 March 1969 while serving as platoon leader during a night ambush operation near Lai Khe. As his element moved toward a rendezvous point, an enemy force assaulted the patrol with claymore mines, automatic weapons, and rocket-propelled grenades. Lieutenant Frericks quickly deployed his men into defensive positions to return fire on the hostile force. Learning that two of his flank security men had been wounded in the initial enemy barrage, he immediately braved the intense fusillade to assist the two casualties to safety. While he was heroically administering lifesaving first aid to one of the injured men, he was critically wounded by small arms fire. First Lieutenant Frericks' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.



    General Orders: Headquarters, U.S. Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2525 (July 12, 1969)



    Action Date: March 12, 1969



    Service: Army



    Rank: First Lieutenant



    Company: Company C



    Battalion: 1st Battalion



    Regiment: 18th Infantry Regiment



    Division: 1st Infantry Division

    MORE
  • We Remember

    Posted on 12/7/10 - by Robert Sage rsage@austin.rr.com
    Louis is buried at Paynes Point Cemetery, Oregon,IL. DSC BSM ARCOM PH
  • I miss you my friend and fellow soldier.

    Posted on 4/18/08 - by Tom Padden paddent@aol.com
    Lou Frericks was my friend from OCS. We both graduated from 56th OCS Company on approximately Nov. 23, 1967. I went to Ft. Ord and taught Machine Gun at the 800 meter range while Lou, I believe went to Airborne school and served with a training unit prior to Jungle Training in Panama.

    Lou was a very handsome guy who was a good athlete and had a great sense of humor. I hope someone will post his picture. I will if his family doesn't

    Lou and I met again in Viet Nam as we were both assigned to the Big Red one and also the same company-- Charlie "C" Company, 1st Battalion, 18th Infantry. I was the first platoon leader referred to as Lima (or Lima 6) and Lou was the second platoon leader--Mike and Lou was Mike 6. His entire call sign was Dogface Charlie Mike 6.

    Lou and I had many good times together. He was a very good leader who was well like by his men. He was killed in action in the Michellon rubber plantation on March 12, 1969.

    I was on R and R in Hawaii meeting my future wife at that time and while not excited about being back I was excited about just seeing the US put a man on the moon. Also, we had very few casualties in the Company and I expected our luck never to run out or at least not during my tour.

    The world turned upside down when I returned from R and R and I was just devastated to hear that Lou had been killed when he went out to bring back his wounded flank security man during a NVA ambush. Lou was hit with a 51 caliber round in the head. His parents were not allowed to take a last look at their son because the extent of his wounds. I visited his parents- Harold and Marie when I returned from the War in Aug. 1969 at their farm in Kings Illionis. I also visited Lou's gravesite which was on a church property or near a church not far from Lou's home. Mr. Frericks confided in me that he made the Army open Lou's casket to make sure it was son. He told me that he has not told Lou's mother. He also told me that he was sick at what had been done to his son. Marie Frericks told me that Harold never recovered from his loss. She never recovered either.

    I was looking forward to having a friend and confidant for life with Lou. Lou I sure miss you and think about you often

    Later buddy,

    Tom Padden Santa Monica, CA
    MORE
1 2

The Wall of Faces

Brought to you by the organization that built The Wall, the Vietnam Veterans Virtual Memorial Wall is dedicated to honoring, remembering and sharing the legacies of all those who died in the Vietnam War. Here you can go beyond the names on The Wall to see the faces, share the stories and read the remembrances posted by friends, neighbors, classmates and family members.

All of these photos will be showcased in The Education Center at The Wall on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. To learn more about the effort to collect these photos and ensure their faces will never be forgotten, visit www.buildthecenter.org.